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Hi. Question for you. I have a 2016 chest Traverse. We have the factory towing package. We are looking into buying a camper that has a GVWR of 4950. We are a family of 5. We probably will only put about 600 pounds in trailer. Dry weight of trailer is 4205. Our family is about 700 pounds in the car. I plan on getting WDH with trailer. Am I over weight capacity for towing? Do I need to add the people to the dry weight total? Thanks for your help in advance
 

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Yes, you need to add gear and weight of passengers to the total, so with a family of 5 and your gear you look to be well over the 5K towing capacity.
 

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Yea I tend to agree with @dave00 ... I don't know the exact numbers but I have a feeling you will be exceeding one or a few, most notably the GCWR and payload, possibly max rear axle weight rating.

Only way to know for sure is load it up and go to the scales and see.
 

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First - scratch the phrase "dry weight" from your vocabulary. Your trailer NEVER weighed the dry weight. It's a ploy used by manufacturers to suck in the unsuspecting. Read the definition of Unloaded Vehicle Weight on the back of your trailers brochure. Batteries, ovens, air conditioners, etc are almost always considered "options" and are not covered by "dry weight."

Second - You will be pushing it. In addition to towing capacity, you need to deal with payload. Since you haven't weighed the trailer "ready-to-camp", you need to assume it weighs the GVWR. Assuming it's a twin axle trailer, that means your tongue weight will be about 13% (25% for a single axle trailer), or 4950 x 0.13 = 643 lbs. Add the weight of a WDH of about 75 lbs and you're at 718 lbs on the hitch. (This alone may be more than your hitch is rated for.) Now look at the payload sticker on your drivers door frame. It will say something like "Weight of cargo and occupants should not exceed XX lbs." (Mine is about 1500 lbs.) Assuming yours is similar to mine, you now have 1500 - 718 = 781 lbs to cover you, wife, kids, dogs, and anything else that you put in the vehicle. If you and the wife are average of 185 lbs and 125 lbs each, there's 210 lbs, now leaving you 571 lbs for kids, dogs and stuff.

So, can you do it? Sure. You could pull the Space Shuttle with it, just like the Toyota Tundra. Will it be safe? Maybe, maybe not; it will be close. Will it put a lot stress and strain on your vehicle? Definitely. Remember you're pulling a giant sail down the highway.

Before I got smart, I pulled a 4000 lb ready-to-camp hybrid trailer (4770 lb GVWR) one season in the flat midwest, with just the wife and I. I wasn't a happy camper. Then I got a real truck to pull it.

Personally, I wouldn't pull more than a popup (say 3600 lbs GVWR) with a Traverse.

Good luck.
 

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I'm in a similar situation. I have a 2014 Traverse and I looking into if I can get a small car hauler and pull my old Chevelle around with it. The Chevelle weighs 3165 lbs and the trailer I'll looking at buying is a 16'X83", dual 3500 lb axle, flatbed (Don't know the exact weight but I'm guessing just over 900 lbs) I'm finding conflicting info out there. I have a camper website saying it can pull a camper weighting 4600 lbs yet other sites are saying 2000 lbs Is the limit on these vehicles. If it helps this is the trailer: Council Bluffs
 

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I'm in a similar situation. I have a 2014 Traverse and I looking into if I can get a small car hauler and pull my old Chevelle around with it. The Chevelle weighs 3165 lbs and the trailer I'll looking at buying is a 16'X83", dual 3500 lb axle, flatbed (Don't know the exact weight but I'm guessing just over 900 lbs) I'm finding conflicting info out there. I have a camper website saying it can pull a camper weighting 4600 lbs yet other sites are saying 2000 lbs Is the limit on these vehicles. If it helps this is the trailer: Council Bluffs
Do you have the tow package? If you are unsure, open your glovebox and look for the V92 code. If you do, you can tow 5200 lbs provided all of your other weight limits are met. If not, you are limited to 2000 lbs. BUT, you can add all of the parts from the tow package (contact @greentraverse for a comprehensive list) to yours without much headache.

FWIW I made a quick trip with our Pilot, rated to tow 4500 lbs with my '61 Impala on a trailer. Wouldn't do it again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
First - scratch the phrase "dry weight" from your vocabulary. Your trailer NEVER weighed the dry weight. It's a ploy used by manufacturers to suck in the unsuspecting. Read the definition of Unloaded Vehicle Weight on the back of your trailers brochure. Batteries, ovens, air conditioners, etc are almost always considered "options" and are not covered by "dry weight."

Second - You will be pushing it. In addition to towing capacity, you need to deal with payload. Since you haven't weighed the trailer "ready-to-camp", you need to assume it weighs the GVWR. Assuming it's a twin axle trailer, that means your tongue weight will be about 13% (25% for a single axle trailer), or 4950 x 0.13 = 643 lbs. Add the weight of a WDH of about 75 lbs and you're at 718 lbs on the hitch. (This alone may be more than your hitch is rated for.) Now look at the payload sticker on your drivers door frame. It will say something like "Weight of cargo and occupants should not exceed XX lbs." (Mine is about 1500 lbs.) Assuming yours is similar to mine, you now have 1500 - 718 = 781 lbs to cover you, wife, kids, dogs, and anything else that you put in the vehicle. If you and the wife are average of 185 lbs and 125 lbs each, there's 210 lbs, now leaving you 571 lbs for kids, dogs and stuff.

So, can you do it? Sure. You could pull the Space Shuttle with it, just like the Toyota Tundra. Will it be safe? Maybe, maybe not; it will be close. Will it put a lot stress and strain on your vehicle? Definitely. Remember you're pulling a giant sail down the highway.

Before I got smart, I pulled a 4000 lb ready-to-camp hybrid trailer (4770 lb GVWR) one season in the flat midwest, with just the wife and I. I wasn't a happy camper. Then I got a real truck to pull it.

Personally, I wouldn't pull more than a popup (say 3600 lbs GVWR) with a Traverse.

Good luck.
We ended up getting a double axle camper with a dry weight of 3120. I calculated for the amount of people in car will be 950. That's with stuff also. I have the factory towing package and underneath the hitch says 5200 max. I'm assuming tongue weight will be 600 on a class 3? If idoyour math you said. It will be 585 on tongue. It says at GVWR it's 4500 so if I add my passengers and stuff to dry weight will be 4070 pounds. Now I know we are not going to put 1200pounds in trailer even if I did not include passengers and stuff. Am I still in the range of being ok to tow? Just your opinion.
 

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We ended up getting a double axle camper with a dry weight of 3120. I calculated for the amount of people in car will be 950. That's with stuff also. I have the factory towing package and underneath the hitch says 5200 max. I'm assuming tongue weight will be 600 on a class 3? If idoyour math you said. It will be 585 on tongue. It says at GVWR it's 4500 so if I add my passengers and stuff to dry weight will be 4070 pounds. Now I know we are not going to put 1200pounds in trailer even if I did not include passengers and stuff. Am I still in the range of being ok to tow? Just your opinion.
It sounds like you went from being just over to just under the rated capacities.

It will go and stop. Depending on where you tow you may be running pretty high RPMs at times, but that's the nature of a DOHC V6 designed for use in cars being used in a tow vehicle. If you have your WDH and sway control dialed in they should both be pretty well managed unless the trailer is too long for the Traverse wheelbase. My biggest concern with towing near the limits are the brakes, even if you upgrade them you only have so much stopping power vs. a larger tow vehicle.

IMO the Traverse will do what you ask it to do safely as long as you take your time and brake early. Keep the transmission fluid fresh and look for a more appropriate tow vehicle at some point.
 

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We ended up getting a double axle camper with a dry weight of 3120. I calculated for the amount of people in car will be 950. That's with stuff also. I have the factory towing package and underneath the hitch says 5200 max. I'm assuming tongue weight will be 600 on a class 3? If idoyour math you said. It will be 585 on tongue. It says at GVWR it's 4500 so if I add my passengers and stuff to dry weight will be 4070 pounds. Now I know we are not going to put 1200pounds in trailer even if I did not include passengers and stuff. Am I still in the range of being ok to tow? Just your opinion.
Most every (but not all) Class III hitches I've seen have tongue weights rated for 1/10th the tow rating, e.g., 6000 lb tow/600 lb tongue, although sometimes these numbers change (usually higher) if using a WDH; sometimes the WDH only changes the tongue weight rating.. I don't have a factory hitch, so I don't know if your hitch says anything on it about tongue weight limit. If it doesn't, I would assume 1/10th of the tow capacity for the tongue weight.

Again - forget dry weight. Never utter the term again.

With respect to your "new" trailer: With a GVWR of 4500 lbs, your tongue weight will be (4500 x .13) + 75 WDH or 660 lbs. That's an improvement over the 718 lbs tongue weight calculated for your first trailer. BUT: With 950 lbs for people and 660 lbs for tongue weight, that's a total of 1610 lbs, meaning you're 110 lbs OVER your (assumed) 1500 lb payload.

Also, I think you'll be surprised how much you'll put in the trailer, especially for 5 people. The battery alone is probably 50 lbs. If there's an oven, add that. A/C unit? Add that. Spare tire? It's most likely an "option." Add that. Awning? Probably an option. Add that. Do they give you a grill? Add that. Now add in: sewer hoses, water hoses, electric cord, any fresh water/waste water you may end up carrying in the tanks (@8 lbs/gal), clothes, bedding, cookware, TV, toilet articles (including soap, razors, shaving cream, toothpaste/brush, towels), tools, flashlights, books, radios, video game players, toys, fire wood, food, coolers, chocks, leveling blocks, first aid kit, etc. Any single item may not be much, but they all add up.
 

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I'm in a similar situation. I have a 2014 Traverse and I looking into if I can get a small car hauler and pull my old Chevelle around with it. The Chevelle weighs 3165 lbs and the trailer I'll looking at buying is a 16'X83", dual 3500 lb axle, flatbed (Don't know the exact weight but I'm guessing just over 900 lbs) I'm finding conflicting info out there. I have a camper website saying it can pull a camper weighting 4600 lbs yet other sites are saying 2000 lbs Is the limit on these vehicles. If it helps this is the trailer: Council Bluffs
No way is a Traverse up to that. I towed a '09 Malibu and a Sable a few times on a trailer with my '11 5.3 Tahoe and it was was working doing that. Stopping is the biggest issue, even with a trailer with brakes.
When it comes to towing heavy my Traverse is a toy compared to my Tahoe.
Single axle trailer would be the Traverse's max trailer capacity. Two axle trailer you are into real truck territory.
 

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We ended up getting a double axle camper with a dry weight of 3120. I calculated for the amount of people in car will be 950. That's with stuff also. I have the factory towing package and underneath the hitch says 5200 max. I'm assuming tongue weight will be 600 on a class 3? If idoyour math you said. It will be 585 on tongue. It says at GVWR it's 4500 so if I add my passengers and stuff to dry weight will be 4070 pounds. Now I know we are not going to put 1200pounds in trailer even if I did not include passengers and stuff. Am I still in the range of being ok to tow? Just your opinion.

You should be fine with that setup.

You don't have to add your passengers to your tow limit. The 5200lbs tow rating is just for the trailer. You need to make sure you don't exceed the GCVW (Traverse + trailer), which is around 10,400lbs if I remember correctly.

You also need to note the payload on your door jamb. there will be a sticker that says the weight of cargo and passengers is not to exceed x,xxxlbs. So you, your passengers, cargo and tongue weight of the trailer cannot exceed this weight. On my Traverse its' around 1530lbs.

For 6 years I towed a Jayco JayFeather x213 with a GVWR of 5500lbs. Empty (not dry) the trailer was 4200lbs. With our cargo we were at 5000lbs.

We travelled from Ontario to Virginia Beach 3 times and also went down to Myrtle Beach. The mountains were fine. I was surprised how well the 3.6L handled the trailer.

In 2016 I moved up to an F150 with the Ecoboost. There is no comparison between the F150 and the Traverse, but we were happy for the 6 years we used the Traverse.

I still have the Traverse, 235,000km on the odometer. It's been retired from towing, as we have upgraded our trailer to an 8200lbs model.

10363
 

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Do you have the tow package? If you are unsure, open your glovebox and look for the V92 code. If you do, you can tow 5200 lbs provided all of your other weight limits are met. If not, you are limited to 2000 lbs. BUT, you can add all of the parts from the tow package (contact @greentraverse for a comprehensive list) to yours without much headache.

FWIW I made a quick trip with our Pilot, rated to tow 4500 lbs with my '61 Impala on a trailer. Wouldn't do it again.
I checked and I do have the V92 code listed. It does have the factory hitch and the tow button under the radio. I don't plan to haul my Chevelle around on the trailer all the time. It will be more like a "I have to take it to the shop" kind of thing. Other than that I plan to just haul random things that I would imagine will not be as heavy as the Chevelle. It does make me miss the towing capacity of my Yukon. I used to have an 04' GTO as well, I surprised the guy a uHaul when I rented a 6x12 dual axle enclosed trailer from them when I moved from Texas to Illinois. The guy was telling me I couldn't do it...I had to force him to look in his computer. He was very surprised when his system said it would work. The trailer was full and I still got 19mpg driving interstate speeds all the way up. Sadly that hitch couldn't handle me spinning our years later doing about 20 miles an hour (black ice)...ripped the 2 rear bolts clean out of the bottom of the car and twisted it under the trunk pain.

Thanks for the info, I'm more confident it can handle the occasional trip hear and there.
 

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You should be fine with that setup.

You don't have to add your passengers to your tow limit. The 5200lbs tow rating is just for the trailer. You need to make sure you don't exceed the GCVW (Traverse + trailer), which is around 10,400lbs if I remember correctly.

You also need to note the payload on your door jamb. there will be a sticker that says the weight of cargo and passengers is not to exceed x,xxxlbs. So you, your passengers, cargo and tongue weight of the trailer cannot exceed this weight. On my Traverse its' around 1530lbs.

For 6 years I towed a Jayco JayFeather x213 with a GVWR of 5500lbs. Empty (not dry) the trailer was 4200lbs. With our cargo we were at 5000lbs.

We travelled from Ontario to Virginia Beach 3 times and also went down to Myrtle Beach. The mountains were fine. I was surprised how well the 3.6L handled the trailer.

In 2016 I moved up to an F150 with the Ecoboost. There is no comparison between the F150 and the Traverse, but we were happy for the 6 years we used the Traverse.

I still have the Traverse, 235,000km on the odometer. It's been retired from towing, as we have upgraded our trailer to an 8200lbs model.

View attachment 10363
Did you do it with 950 lbs of people in the Traverse? Did you see my calculations. He's very probably 110 lbs over the payload on his door sticker.
 

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Tow ratings are simple.
1. Trailer loaded has to be below the max trailer weight rating.
2. Vehicle + loaded trailer + all gear + people has to be less than GCWR.
3. Weight on the rear axle has to be less than the rear axle weight rating.
4. Vehicle + all gear + people has to be less than GVWR.
5. Tongue weight less than max tongue weight rating.

#3 is the only tricky one. I've always calculated this by taking the weight distribution percentage for the rear listed by car magazines, multiply that by the total vehicle weight listed on the door jam, add the weight of half the passengers (more if you have heavy people in the back), add weight of all your gear in the trunk, add the tongue weight (13% of trailer weight is a good assumption if you haven't weighed yours). This should get you close.

I'm not a fan of being right at the limit, of the GCWR or an axle weight rating.

*Edit: I added #4 and #5, corrected #2
 

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Tow ratings are simple.
1. Trailer loaded has to be below the max trailer weight rating.
2. Vehicle + loaded trailer + all gear + people has to be less than GVWR.
3. Weight on the rear axle has to be less than the rear axle weight rating.

#3 is the only tricky one. I've always calculated this by taking the weight distribution percentage for the rear listed by car magazines, multiply that by the total vehicle weight listed on the door jam, add the weight of half the passengers (more if you have heavy people in the back), add weight of all your gear in the trunk, add the tongue weight (13% of trailer weight is a good assumption if you haven't weighed yours). This should get you close.

I'm not a fan of being right at the limit, of the GVWR or an axle weight rating.
In #2, replace GVWR with GCWR*, which is listed in the Owners manual (pg 261 for 2017; probably the same for 2016).

*The Gross Combination Weight Rating (GCWR) is the total allowable weight of the completely loaded vehicle and
trailer including any passengers, cargo, equipment and conversions.

You've also ignored the tongue weight limit on the hitch.
 

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Tow ratings are simple.
1. Trailer loaded has to be below the max trailer weight rating.
2. Vehicle + loaded trailer + all gear + people has to be less than GVWR.
3. Weight on the rear axle has to be less than the rear axle weight rating.

#3 is the only tricky one. I've always calculated this by taking the weight distribution percentage for the rear listed by car magazines, multiply that by the total vehicle weight listed on the door jam, add the weight of half the passengers (more if you have heavy people in the back), add weight of all your gear in the trunk, add the tongue weight (13% of trailer weight is a good assumption if you haven't weighed yours). This should get you close.

I'm not a fan of being right at the limit, of the GVWR or an axle weight rating.
None of it is tricky if the OP takes the setup to the scales, fully loaded with the family and stuff in the trailer as they will be traveling, and has it weighed.

I strongly recommend anyone towing near the limits of any vehicle have the setup weighed.
 
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None of it is tricky if the OP takes the setup to the scales, fully loaded with the family and stuff in the trailer as they will be traveling, and has it weighed.

I strongly recommend anyone towing near the limits of any vehicle have the setup weighed.
Yes, you need to weigh it. The problem is that you can't weigh it before you buy it. So the tricky part is trying to ESTIMATE your numbers BEFORE you purchase the trailer. That's were people get screwed by using dry weight. Always assume the worst and use the trailers GVWR.

Making it worse, people think the Traverse is a truck. It's not. It's not even an SUV. It's a CUV, with no frame.

And many people believe you shouldn't exceed 80% of the limits, in order to maintain some margin (like for an extra passenger, or whatever).
 

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Thanks for the good points @greentraverse, I corrected my post. Also, I completely agree @cintocrunch that it's important to get a trailer weighed, including the tongue weight. With something like a travel trailer, it's important to move weight around the trailer to wherever it may be and both with and without water and fuel in the trailer. That way you know the tongue weight doesn't drop too much.
 

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@greentraverse just because a vehicle is unibody does not mean it is a compact utility vehicle, a designation meaning the vehicle is smaller than a regular SUV. Do you consider the Jeep Grand Cherokee or Dodge Durango CUVs? A unibody vehicle can be really strong, it all depends on the structure design and not if it is made in two parts.

I completely agree though that the Traverse is not a true truck or a towing beast. It's not designed for that considering the power and weight ratings. Travel trailers are also notorious for weighing more than advertised. Also, many travel trailers are bricks in the wind. You need a lot more power to drive at highway speeds and something like a boat. I personally would be really cautious in picking a travel trailer for the Traverse, or I'd get a better tow vehicle.

This all comes from someone who plans to get a boat and tow with the Traverse. Boats are easier to get full towed weights for, others often post truck scale results. I won't go over 4k towing.
 

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Traverse will handle a single axle travel trailer. Double axle and your over the top, yes it will pull it but your just beating up the tow vehicle and pushing the envelope to the extreme.
My decision to buy a Traverse as a back up tow vehicle was determined by my trailer ''fleet'' of a pop up, 6x6x12 3500lb GVWR cargo trailer, 2 place snowmobile trailer and a 18' pontoon boat on a 3500 lb. GVWR trailer.
My Equinox will tow my fleet if needed but I will not beat it up if it's not necessary.
My loaded cargo trailer is my hardest tow and it has a slight V nose, full size camper (giant wind block) over 4k lbs. loaded up and vehicle loaded into the wind at highway speed your just beating the snot out of a Traverse.
 
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