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So I pulled in the garage yesterday, and noticed that at some point, I got some light surface scratches on the passenger side doors. It looks like somebody squeezed in between cars in a parking lot and scraped their winter coat arm against the paint.
Anybody know of a good paint scratch remover or buffing kit I can use? I have rubbing compound, but am scared to damage the paint even further. Suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
 

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You can try to do this by hand, but it will take a very long time. Meguiar's Ultimate Compound or 3M Liquid Compound used with a buffer should do the trick. The bonnet on the buffer should have a little cutting ability, but not too much. We're only talking about taking some light scratching out, not rehabilitating an oxidized finish. Synthetic sheeps-wool or a foam bonnet with mild to medium cutting (depending on how deep the scratches are) should take care of the majority of these scratches. Let the buffer do the work--too much pressure can do more harm than good. Follow with a good quality wax to put some protection back on that paint. If you need any buffer pad suggestions, go to AutoGeek.net--they've got more detailing stuff than you can imagine.

Best of luck.
 

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I will second Todzilla here.

The main thing is only getting as aggressive as you need to on compound and pad. Start with your most mild of both, and work your way up. I also use Autogeek.net, and their products are top notch, and get to your door fast.

Good Luck. :wine:
 

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I should have specified that you use a random-orbital buffer for this task. I you use a high-speed polishing-type buffer you can burn through paint before you know it especially on contours and sharp edges/corners. Let the body shop guys use those types of buffers.

And as Mr. GXP said, don't start too aggressive. If using a buffer, put a small amount of product on the buffer pad, wipe the pad on the affected area, then turn on the buffer. Make 50% overlapping passes horizontally, then do the same vertically before wiping compound from paint. Look at the area from different angles (use a hand-held light of some sort if you need to) and feel the finish to see if you've gotten the issue resolved. If not, I recommend doing the previous steps one more time and use the same amount of pressure on the buffer. If you're making progress there's no need to get more aggressive or discouraged. Some compounds create a good amount of dust--the Meguiar's isn't bad though. When you're done using compound spray a little quick detail spray on a good microfiber towel and wipe down the area prior to waxing.

Let us know how this turns out for you.
 
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