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Discussion Starter #1
Heya all!

My 2010 Traverse with 120k miles hit me with another P0008 code.

I had the chains replaced in 2015 with only 55k miles on it.

I was living in the city back then, so obviously didn't put a whole lot of miles on it in the first 5 years. I actually slid in under the warranty period (like 4 years and 9 months or something).

Anyway, right after that I retired and moved to the country.

I put a lot more miles on it in only 3 years!

Of course, it wasn't covered under warranty, and the dealership wanted $3200 or so to do the job.

I have a good certified mechanic buddy that could do it for about $2400.

Since it wasn't worth anything either fixed or broken, I figured I'd tackle the job myself.

I'll post up a quick video I made talking about the tools I used as soon as it gets done uploading to YouTube... sometime in the next week!!

Overall, it was a big pain, but certainly doable by anyone that has ever done any major work like restoring an old car or rebuilding an old 350.

I think the video will be a big help for anyone planning on doing it.

Also, repairprocedures.com has the factory service manual online. You can rent it for $10 per day.

I know there is a copy of a service manual out there you can get for free, and I did track it down, but it's for a 2009 Buick. There were enough differences that I suspect that manual is for the older 3.6. I wouldn't suggest using that one, it's not that helpful. The online version at repairprocedures was perfect.

The Cloyes video on YouTube is a huge help. Once you get to that point of the job, follow that video exactly and the replacement of the chains is actually pretty anti-climatic. Getting to the chains is the challenge.

However, once I got all the tools like I show in the video, it actually wasn't too bad. I was waiting on a few of them to come to me via Amazon/UPS/Etc., but once everything came together it was ok.

I think it took me about 20 hours by myself. I did space it out over nearly a week, as I was waiting on tools and also didn't want to get frustrated.

Now that I have the right tools, and know what I'm doing, I could probably do it in 8 or 10 hours. Especially if I had a buddy to help with some of the tasks.

Anyway, check out the video (once it FINALLY uploads) and ask away. I'll try to help.

I ended up trading it in on a 2019 Colorado. It has the 3.6 as well, but it's the new 4th-Gen version. It was interesting comparing the two engines, as they obviously share some common ancestry.

I did read about the new engine and it seems like they fixed a lot of problems with the oiling and VVT systems.

--Trick414
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Finally, the video finished uploading.

I didn't do any editing, so forgive some of the abrupt breaks and such.



 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Although there hasn't been any interest yet, I'll start with some things I learned:

I should note that my Traverse was delivered and driven in Texas for about 98% of it's life.

So, all bolts came out easily. If you are in Upstate New York, all bets are off.



Power Steering Pump:

If you watch the YouTube videos, this is a really tough part of the job.

This is actually really easy when you are doing the timing chain.

Do the PS pump LAST!!!

By then, you will have disconnected the hoses on the upper end of the engine, as well as removed the bolt on the clamp that holds it to the engine.

The low-pressure line is connected by a small bolt (10mm I think) to the pump. It's easy to remove with a wrench and then by hand.

The high-pressure line is a typical compression fitting. Again, release it with the appropriate wrench and it will screw off by hand.

Remove the lower bolt from the front of the engine cover. This is really easy (with the Milwaukee 3/8" impact!!!!!!!!!)

From inside the wheel well you should be able to see the upper bolt once you move the lines out of the way. They will move freely since you already released them on the upper engine.

Get the swivel socket and several 3/8" extensions as long as you can, and break the upper bolt loose with a ratchet. Switch to the impact and run it off.

The pump will fall free at that point.

No need to fight it out of there, just move it out of the way and let it sit there until you re-install it.

Get ready for it to drain out.

Getting it out would make this a tough job, but since we don't need to replace it, it is really easy since you just let it lay there.

Basically, you can do it in about 5 minutes.

Hope that helps!

Again, post up any questions!

--Trick414
 

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Discussion Starter #4
While researching this project, I ran across several videos. Everyone kept talking about having to lean over the engine bay to get to everything.

Early on while I was doing the work, I had the same problem.

I started designing, in my head, some type of cat-walk around the front of the truck to be able to get at the engine parts.

Then, I finally did the smart thing and just took the jack-stands out and lowered the front of the truck down to the ground.

It was just resting on the jack in the relaxed position. The brake discs are about one inch above the floor, so no worries there.

Anyway, I wanted to post that up because sometimes the simple things, that are SO OBVIOUS, slip by sometimes.
 

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Trick414, thank you for posting your experience with your timing chain replacement job! I recently purchased a 2010 Traverse LS with 145k that has the P0008 / P0017 codes and I am about to tackle this job myself. I appreciate your tools video as it confirmed that I have most of what I need except for the harmonic balancer heavy impact socket. It's now on it's way .. :). I did purchase every part I could think of, all OEM except for the Cloyes timing chain set. I'm looking forward to keeping this great family hauler on the road for many more years, thanks for sharing your story.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Great, let me know how it goes!!!

Shoot me a PM if you run across any issues.

It's still really fresh in my mind, so I should be able to help.
 

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I'm hoping to tackle this job sometime over the next few weeks. The biggest variable is the weather here in the Northeast as I don't have a garage, and there is snow in the forecast, lol. If I need too, I'll tap family or friends for a better place to get this done. I have all of the parts and all of the tools by this weekend. I bought the 3/8 Milwaukee ratchet you highly recommended and the 2767 1/2" impact driver so that the harmonic balancer bolt won't be an issue.


Question: Did you remove the front cat and starter to use the flywheel holding tool? I have the tool but won't need it for the bolt removal. It's the installation procedure that has me concerned.


Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yes, I removed the front cat and starter to use the holding tool.

All my exhaust bolts and nuts came off pretty easily, but like I said I'm in Texas. Use plenty of penetrating oil and/or heat, as I'm sure you know.

I didn't need the holding tool for the bolt removal, as it spun off without having to hold the engine at all.

However, it is handy to have, both for while you are doing the chains, as well as putting the new balancer bolt back on.

I used the old balancer bolt and the balancer socket to run the balancer back on to the crank. It seems like I remember something about not doing that back in the old days, but it went on so easily with the cordless impact I don't know what the problem would be.
 

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Trick414 - Thanks again for your post on your timing chain replacement! I followed your tool suggestions and I also highly recommend the Milwaukee M12 3/8" ratchet and the Lisle harmonic balancer heavy socket as they both far exceeded my expectations.

I successfully replaced the timing chain in my, new to me, 2010 Traverse with 147k miles. It always ran great, but had the P0008 and P0017 codes present. The old chains were all stretched, particularly bank 1 (closest to the firewall) and the bottom primary chain as indicated by lots of looseness on the smaller sprockets. It was obvious that they were ready to skip teeth at any moment. I am so glad that I finally got it done.

I took my time, replaced solenoids, cam sensors, water pump, etc. and I guesstimate about 24 hours of actual wrench time.

The Traverse ran great on the 40 mile ride home from my sister's garage with no check engine light.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
That's awesome! Great to hear!

I think I only put about 500 miles on mine after the codes showed up. My chains weren't loose at all, but the tensioners were fully extended. It sounds like you got to yours just in time.

Did you have any problem with the power steering pump? I thought it was surprisingly easy compared to some of the videos I watched. Of course, I wasn't trying to stick my hand up there and turn it with a wrench...which I think is key.

--Trick414
 

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The power steering pump was easy to remove once I understood that the hoses were attached to the right hand head (closest to firewall) with 10 mm bolt holding a bracket. As you recommended, I unbolted it last and removing the pump (actually, just pushing it aside) wasn't that difficult. The upper bolt behind the pulley is tricky to reach, but doable with extensions and a universal joint.


I did have a leak at the low pressure line, the one with the 10 mm bolt, when I filled it with fluid. It was flush with the pump, but the o-ring must have not been just right. I pulled it apart, cleaned it, and put it back together again and the problem was solved.


This Traverse traveled at least 10k miles with the timing chain codes present as the previous owner drove it 8 months, and my wife and I 2 months more before this replacement.


The funny part is once everything around the timing cover has been removed, there is plenty of space to work on the chains themselves.



Sorry to sound like a broken record, but thanks again for your post.
 

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I am going to be tackling this job sometime after the new year. I have one question, for now. I am sure I may have more as I get closer to doing this. What fluids do I need to drain from the engine before I start this?

Thanks

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
 

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I removed everything on the passenger side of the engine in addition to the intake manifold and valve covers. I don't believe you'll have enough clearance to separate the timing cover from the engine with the water pump installed.

This is basically what I did.

Disconnect the battery and isolate the + terminal

I removed (didn't keep a list, just thinking it through again):

coolant - removed lower hose from radiator using special hose clamp tool
power steering fluid - I removed the return hose from the pump, 10 mm bolt. This drains onto a motor mount, messy.
fuse box - 2 10 mm bolts in center, just loosen until they feel free, box is 2 plastic pieces held together by clips, then metal base
Power steering reservoir - disconnect small line in front,then it moves around enough. Use rags to prevent alternator contamination.
Power steering mounting bracket
Upper coolant hose and flange
engine torque mount - this prevents fore/aft movement, ok to remove without supporting engine
Serpentine belt
Alternator - some just remove nut and stud into timing cover, I removed it entirely for the room
Water pump - 6 10 mm bolts
Power steering pump
Harmonic balancer - I used a high torque impact to get this off without trouble. You will need a puller and I used an installer tool.
Timing cover - tons of bolts, some in the center

Intake snorkel and air box cover
PVC tubes and vacuum hoses - disconnect to get out of the way
Intake Manifold
Valve covers

Followed Cloyes video for timing, although I used the 3 piece cam holding tools described in the video in this thread as an extra precaution.

Quadruple check timing

Put it back together

Fill fluids. Get both front wheels off the ground to turn wheels from lock to lock with engine off to burp initial air from power steering. It takes a while, many on off cycles to get all of the air out.

I have been a regular DIY mechanic for decades now and this was very near the top in terms of complexity and detail.

I also replaced everything except the cam phasers. Timing chain, idlers, tensioners, and guides. All gaskets, water pump, cam solenoids, cam position sensors, serpentine belt, idler, and tensioner. Spark plugs too.

Best of luck to you and to anybody else who wants to tackle this job.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Does the water pump have to be removed?

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

Yes it does. However, by the time you get to that point and have removed all the other accessories and items, it's super easy.

As I noted in the video, the cordless right-angle impact is SUPER helpful.
 

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Yes it does. However, by the time you get to that point and have removed all the other accessories and items, it's super easy.

As I noted in the video, the cordless right-angle impact is SUPER helpful.

Please read this entire thread and watch Trick414's video carefully. Having the proper tools is key to this job. A right angle ratchet was not on my radar screen, but I bought one for this job. It saved a TON of time and I'm wondering how I lived without it to date. Additionally, make sure to have lots of lighting. I bought a magnetic base 380 lumen battery powered slim light from Harbor Freight and it was very useful.
 

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Thanks for all the help. I purchased the Haynes online repair manual and I am hoping that it will help me. The only tool I can't find is the EN-46106. Is it possible to do it without it? Any help in locating it would really be appreciated.

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... The only tool I can't find is the EN-46106. Is it possible to do it without it?...
Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

I bought one on ebay, but I didn't use it. I live in the Northeast and my exhaust bolts are rusty and I didn't want to add that to my list of replacement items. It's necessary to remove the front cat to remove the starter.


I used a Milwaukee 2767 1/2 impact, total overkill probably, to get the harmonic balancer bolt off, and to tighten it on the mid-torque setting with lots of loctite. I have checked the bolt since, and it's fine.
 
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