Traverse Forum banner

1 - 20 of 54 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Folks. I'm a DIYer and just changed the oil in my 2019. Super easy btw. Anyway, only the best for my cars, so I put in 5w30 synthetic and a Delco filter (heard there were issues with other filters). Anyway, do I trust the OLM system to accurately gauge when to make the next change? Does it account for the extended life of a synthetic? Does not following the OLM break warranty? Thx in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
The system doesn't test the oil. The computer takes different conditions like engine load, engine temp, outside temp, etc and calculates how the oil is effected. It doesn't know what type of oil you use. Regarding them monitoring things for warranty, it's totally possible and wouldn't surprise me. Now you could always just reset the system when it says to replace oil and track the milage yourself but I actually think the calculation method makes a lot more sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,700 Posts
Can't go wrong changing the oil when the OLM "engine killer" reaches 50%. Rest trip 2 odometer to 0 at the same time as the OLM and you always have a handy, accurate reading of mileage on the oil to supplement the engine killer reading.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I appreciate both of your responses. Seems like there's an opportunity to make this thing a pretty valuable tool but I Don't get why GM wouldn't offer an option in the computer... something like "synthetic or traditional" oil used, since the synth should significantly increase the life of the oil/time between changes. I suppose it's possible, they don't give a ****, and they want me back in the dealership as much as possible... Which ain't gonna happen!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
"OLM Engine Killier" ??? That's a new one to me... modern synthetics and filters have been proven to last the intervals recommended by the manufacturers. Changing before that is never detrimental to an engine but I've never heard someone refer to it as an "engine killer".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Bear in mind, I have a 2011 Traverse, but...

While I have owned it, I have sent my used oil off for analysis a few times and have found that with the Traverse's direct injection engine, it really beats up on the oil, and while my oil still had some TBN left, the Traverse's "oil change monitor" was fairly accurate, to show when you needed a change for the oil quality only. This was me using Penzzoil Platinum full synth oil, or the dealer's synth choice.

Also the Traverse's seem to eat some oil too (maybe the newer 2019 models are different?), so it's important to check your oil level regularly as I would bet by the time your oil life monitor says you're nearing the oil's change time, I would bet you're down at least a quart of oil by then, if not more. That's why people say not to rely only on the oil life monitor only - double-check your level, often.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,689 Posts
Bear in mind, I have a 2011 Traverse, but...

While I have owned it, I have sent my used oil off for analysis a few times and have found that with the Traverse's direct injection engine, it really beats up on the oil, and while my oil still had some TBN left, the Traverse's "oil change monitor" was fairly accurate, to show when you needed a change for the oil quality only. This was me using Penzzoil Platinum full synth oil, or the dealer's synth choice.

Also the Traverse's seem to eat some oil too (maybe the newer 2019 models are different?), so it's important to check your oil level regularly as I would bet by the time your oil life monitor says you're nearing the oil's change time, I would bet you're down at least a quart of oil by then, if not more. That's why people say not to rely only on the oil life monitor only - double-check your level, often.
My 2011 ate oil, too, but my 2017 doesn't. Don't know why.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Can't go wrong changing the oil when the OLM "engine killer" reaches 50%. Rest trip 2 odometer to 0 at the same time as the OLM and you always have a handy, accurate reading of mileage on the oil to supplement the engine killer reading.
I use "Trip A" to calculate fuel economy between fill ups, and I use "Trip B" to monitor mileage between oil changes, and relate it to the OLM. On my 2012, my last oil change (Penzoil Full Synthetic) the OLM was down to 10% at about 3,000 miles. I did do the oil change as it's a cheap insurance policy, but that seems like a low number for full synthetic oil change intervals. Oil level was still right at full on the dipstick, so that's good I guess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,700 Posts
"OLM Engine Killier" ??? That's a new one to me... modern synthetics and filters have been proven to last the intervals recommended by the manufacturers. Changing before that is never detrimental to an engine but I've never heard someone refer to it as an "engine killer".

I didn't coin it, some of the mechanics did. The thing is as dumb as the idiot lights. It's not what it measures, it is what it doesn't monitor or measure. There is no clock in it so it has no idea how long the engine sits between oil changes, it doesn't measure the quality of the air or the gasoline or the oil.....no idea if it is running in sub zero or 100 degree weather or high humidity which promotes organic acid formation in the crankcase, overheat conditions, or the if the quickee change guy loaded in dino oil or bulk recycled oil, whether the PCV system is faulty and if the wrong grade oil or whether it was changed at all when the OLM was reset. And that goes for the filter too.....there is a TSB out on cheapo filters that shed filter material and cause engine damage. That PF63E environmental friendly version of the PF63 is made like crap in comparison, cardboard end caps and glue holding the filter media instead of steel, plastic screen instead of steel. The synthetic old may be good for 15K but no way I'd trust any filter for that length of usage.



I've been doing my own oil changes for over 50 years and I always know what is in it, how much was added and how long it was in and more importantly when the filter was changed and not just wiped clean.......the OLM doesn't have a clue if it was just wiped and the crud oil remained in the filter. Besides every 3-4K is an excellent time to check out the underbelly and running gear......more than one occasion spotted a chafing water hose or cracked sheathing on a brake line.


And with the multiple grades of oil in use and changing crankcase capacities, even a dealer is capable of screwing up and dumping the wrong grade or amount, e.g. 8 qts in a 6 qt crankcase or in the case of later Silverados vice versa.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,700 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Can't go wrong changing the oil when the OLM "engine killer" reaches 50%. Rest trip 2 odometer to 0 at the same time as the OLM and you always have a handy, accurate reading of mileage on the oil to supplement the engine killer reading.[/quote

I gotta agree... Unless you're doing some unusual, "rigorous" driving, 3000 miles on synth seems way too early!

I use "Trip A" to calculate fuel economy between fill ups, and I use "Trip B" to monitor mileage between oil changes, and relate it to the OLM. On my 2012, my last oil change (Penzoil Full Synthetic) the OLM was down to 10% at about 3,000 miles. I did do the oil change as it's a cheap insurance policy, but that seems like a low number for full synthetic oil change intervals. Oil level was still right at full on the dipstick, so that's good I guess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,700 Posts
you're right! Now I need to call my dealer and ask em why they put non-synth oil in for my "free, oil change".



Like I said: "And with the multiple grades of oil in use and changing crankcase capacities, even a dealer is capable of screwing up and dumping the wrong grade or amount, e.g. 8 qts in a 6 qt crankcase or in the case of later Silverados vice versa."



.02 Likely you would have received non-synth even if you paid for the change.....because it is cheaper! Of all my GM's that have qualified, not a single one has had a "free" dealer oil change, but my Traverse always receives 6 qts Mobil 1 5W30 and a new Delco PF63/63E. OEM factory filter is a shorty PF64 to facilitate engine assembly that is labeled in small print replace with a PF63, later ones say PF63E. I wonder how many mechanics eyeball it and replace with a same size PF64 or PF48 or if the filter is on too tight, just wipe it off?


Sometimes the cost of free is too great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Since 2017 all motor oil has needed to meet the new API standard and in the weight specified by GM for the Traverse that means using either a 100% synthetic or a blend. When the newer still 0W16 oils are release they will all be 100% synthetic.

If I drive with trips of average duration of 15 miles and average 30 mph overall then after 6000 miles the oil will have often been working at sub optimal operating temperatures and the engine will have been operating for 200 hours. If on the other hand I mostly drive 45 minutes on the freeway at an average speed of 60 mph then after I add 6000 miles to the car the engine will have been operating for 100 hours. So using mileage as an indicator is very nearly worthless but it is relatively idiot proof. The onboard computer is making an evaluation of remaining oil life based on the driving actually being done and is going to be a lot more reliable as an indicator then miles shown on the odometer.

If I was doing a lot of towing or taking lots of very short trips or spending a lot of time off the road, then I would reduce the change interval. But for 99% of the people driving a SUV this is not going to be the case and no reason not to follow the vehicle's computed value as to when to change the oil (and oil filter and fuel filter and air filter).

With modern engine materials and modern lubricants and no longer having the damage done by tetraethyl lead in the gasoline, the service intervals have more than doubled. One can ignore this and simply change oil every 5,000 miles and put a smile on the faces of the Koch brothers and the Saudi princes but it is not going to increase engine life.

I trust the mechanics at the dealers far more than the guys at the quick lube joints in terms of having the new oil for my Traverse. With my diesel truck though I go to the local Ram dealer as they use Valvoline Blue which is superior the oil I can get at the dealer and the same holds true for the automatic transmission where I go to the local Allison place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Since 2017 all motor oil has needed to meet the new API standard and in the weight specified by GM for the Traverse that means using either a 100% synthetic or a blend. When the newer still 0W16 oils are release they will all be 100% synthetic.

If I drive with trips of average duration of 15 miles and average 30 mph overall then after 6000 miles the oil will have often been working at sub optimal operating temperatures and the engine will have been operating for 200 hours. If on the other hand I mostly drive 45 minutes on the freeway at an average speed of 60 mph then after I add 6000 miles to the car the engine will have been operating for 100 hours. So using mileage as an indicator is very nearly worthless but it is relatively idiot proof. The onboard computer is making an evaluation of remaining oil life based on the driving actually being done and is going to be a lot more reliable as an indicator then miles shown on the odometer.

If I was doing a lot of towing or taking lots of very short trips or spending a lot of time off the road, then I would reduce the change interval. But for 99% of the people driving a SUV this is not going to be the case and no reason not to follow the vehicle's computed value as to when to change the oil (and oil filter and fuel filter and air filter).

With modern engine materials and modern lubricants and no longer having the damage done by tetraethyl lead in the gasoline, the service intervals have more than doubled. One can ignore this and simply change oil every 5,000 miles and put a smile on the faces of the Koch brothers and the Saudi princes but it is not going to increase engine life.

I trust the mechanics at the dealers far more than the guys at the quick lube joints in terms of having the new oil for my Traverse. With my diesel truck though I go to the local Ram dealer as they use Valvoline Blue which is superior the oil I can get at the dealer and the same holds true for the automatic transmission where I go to the local Allison place.
I get this and respect your position. I guess my question is, how do you resolve the fact that oil company's suggest your car is good to go at over 10,000 miles with their synth and the OLM pops up with an oil change at 3000. Something's not right there...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,700 Posts
............
...........With modern engine materials and modern lubricants and no longer having the damage done by tetraethyl lead in the gasoline, the service intervals have more than doubled. One can ignore this and simply change oil every 5,000 miles and put a smile on the faces of the Koch brothers and the Saudi princes but it is not going to increase engine life.


Well I for one don't mind doing 3-4K oil changes and could care less if some of the bucks find their way into the pockets of Koch brothers or Saudi princes. The former pay taxes and the latter return the billions back to the U.S in intel and sales of F16s and F35s......easy to justify and a much better investment than our former Administration who sent billions in plane loads of U.S. cold cash for ransom to an Iranian terrorist regime with smiles on their faces who used these U.S. dollars to fund Worldwide terrorism including the manufacture of IEDs used for killing and maiming of U.S. soldiers and citizens.



And I could care less about changing oil to spare the engine....I beat the crap out of them in early morning back road runs and I haven't traded a vehicle with more than 25K miles in the past 25 years, or one past the 3/36 in the past 20 years. Always get Kelly Blue book excellent condition in trade because if they try to give less I tell them to pull it into their service department and fix for free whatever they find to qualify for less. Changing oil and filters is about the only thing I still can or want to do, a far cry from the my earlier days of rebuilding 50 and 60 era, high mileage junkers out of necessity. Now I only see the dealer for yearly inspection stickers and to repair any crap for free that pi$$es me off. Only exception might be my 38 mo old Silverado w/under 10K because the new ones with rounded wheel wells look more like a Ford and the sleek shaped over creased thinner designer body panels give it an emasculated look which would be more comfortable wearing fender skirts.


Besides, regardless of engine health or longevity the vehicle always seems to run much smoother and peppier with a new charge of juice, and that is what it is all about
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
I didn't coin it, some of the mechanics did. The thing is as dumb as the idiot lights. It's not what it measures, it is what it doesn't monitor or measure. There is no clock in it so it has no idea how long the engine sits between oil changes, it doesn't measure the quality of the air or the gasoline or the oil.....no idea if it is running in sub zero or 100 degree weather or high humidity which promotes organic acid formation in the crankcase, overheat conditions, or the if the quickee change guy loaded in dino oil or bulk recycled oil, whether the PCV system is faulty and if the wrong grade oil or whether it was changed at all when the OLM was reset. And that goes for the filter too.....there is a TSB out on cheapo filters that shed filter material and cause engine damage. That PF63E environmental friendly version of the PF63 is made like crap in comparison, cardboard end caps and glue holding the filter media instead of steel, plastic screen instead of steel. The synthetic old may be good for 15K but no way I'd trust any filter for that length of usage.



I've been doing my own oil changes for over 50 years and I always know what is in it, how much was added and how long it was in and more importantly when the filter was changed and not just wiped clean.......the OLM doesn't have a clue if it was just wiped and the crud oil remained in the filter. Besides every 3-4K is an excellent time to check out the underbelly and running gear......more than one occasion spotted a chafing water hose or cracked sheathing on a brake line.


And with the multiple grades of oil in use and changing crankcase capacities, even a dealer is capable of screwing up and dumping the wrong grade or amount, e.g. 8 qts in a 6 qt crankcase or in the case of later Silverados vice versa.
Are you sure about what is and is not monitored? I know Honda's Maintenance Minder system (around since the early 2000's) monitors oil temperature, engine RPM, coolant temp among many other variables and adjusts the oil life for those factors.

I guess since I perform most of my own oil changes as well (sorry, haven't been doing it for 50 years only 20 or so since I was old enough to help my dad) I always use a high quality synthetic (mostly Mobil1) and a high quality filter and do regular oil level checks. I never change before the OLM or MM (for the Pilot) tell me to and have never had any issues. Both are below 10% right now so maybe I can talk the wife into letting me send off samples for testing to validate or invalidate my intervals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
Well I for one don't mind doing 3-4K oil changes and could care less if some of the bucks find their way into the pockets of Koch brothers or Saudi princes. The former pay taxes and the latter return the billions back to the U.S in intel and sales of F16s and F35s......easy to justify and a much better investment than our former Administration who sent billions in plane loads of U.S. cold cash for ransom to an Iranian terrorist regime with smiles on their faces who used these U.S. dollars to fund Worldwide terrorism including the manufacture of IEDs used for killing and maiming of U.S. soldiers and citizens.



And I could care less about changing oil to spare the engine....I beat the crap out of them in early morning back road runs and I haven't traded a vehicle with more than 25K miles in the past 25 years, or one past the 3/36 in the past 20 years. Always get Kelly Blue book excellent condition in trade because if they try to give less I tell them to pull it into their service department and fix for free whatever they find to qualify for less. Changing oil and filters is about the only thing I still can or want to do, a far cry from the my earlier days of rebuilding 50 and 60 era, high mileage junkers out of necessity. Now I only see the dealer for yearly inspection stickers and to repair any crap for free that pi$$es me off. Only exception might be my 38 mo old Silverado w/under 10K because the new ones with rounded wheel wells look more like a Ford and the sleek shaped over creased thinner designer body panels give it an emasculated look which would be more comfortable wearing fender skirts.


Besides, regardless of engine health or longevity the vehicle always seems to run much smoother and peppier with a new charge of juice, and that is what it is all about
The new Sierra still has the squared off wheel arches... and in general looks better to my eyes... I'm with you, I was not thrilled with them rounding off the wheel arches.
 
1 - 20 of 54 Posts
Top