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Discussion Starter #1
Besides slightly larger tires are there any suspension or ground clearance modifications to be done to increase the pseudo 4-Wheeling capabilities of the vehicle?
 

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Nothing that is available for purchase, you will have to custom make everything. Ground clearance being the biggest concern, the underside of our Traverse has no regard for off roading, just look at how many things are hanging down ready to get damaged by a rock or branch.

Contrast that to our '15 Pilot, which already has a couple inches more ground clearance and everything is tucked up into channels or above frame rails to protect them while off road.
 

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As stated in the manual, even with the AWD models they are not for use off the pavement with the factory 3-season tires. I replaced the factory tires on my AWD Traverse with Continental Contact Terrain tires in size 275/55 R20.

For trail running the better choices are the Subaru Outback or Toyota 4Runner or Toyota Land Cruiser vehicles. The latter two vehicles also have a transfer case and a low range set of gears for rock crawling and have a truck ladder frame for a great deal more rigidity.
 

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If you want a lots of ground clearance have a look at the new Tahoe 2021. You will be surprised .
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks you all. I had never seen anything done with the Traverse off road - just had to ask. I had a 2014 LS and often took it where I shouldn't, after a few trips with cut side walls I put on a set of Wrangler All Terrain with Kevlar and no more side wall punctures, but did have a bit of a roughed up belly and I sawed off a plastic d*** on the front end for more clearance.
 

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Thanks you all. I had never seen anything done with the Traverse off road - just had to ask. I had a 2014 LS and often took it where I shouldn't, after a few trips with cut side walls I put on a set of Wrangler All Terrain with Kevlar and no more side wall punctures, but did have a bit of a roughed up belly and I sawed off a plastic d*** on the front end for more clearance.
Post some pics up! I'm sure more will get into off roading these things as they get older and cheaper. I just worry about the way things are routed/mounted underneath, a lot of important parts are begging to kiss a rock or branch.
 

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there is a lift kit available for us. I will put the kit on mine whenever I decide to replace the struts.
also, what size tire are you currently running? I am running a 265/70-17 with zero issue. If you install the lift you may be able to fit a slightly larger tire, but I think the 265/70 Would be a good tire to stay with just for some suspension movement.

 

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Ahhh, for the good old days of the fifties and early sixties!!! From '57 to '62, my Dad had a '57 Ford Fairlane 500 that had "maybe" 6 inches of ground clearance. We would go places in that car that were insane to think back on---but he would go slow and "crawl" over the obstacles. Granted, there weren't as many electronic inter-related systems with sensors all over the underbody to cause problems; cintocrunch describes it perfectly!. I think the Traverse has potential to do the same type of venturing--if driven with care and respect; maybe an underbelly pan or full length skid plate to protect vulnerable pieces/places. As SnoWh stated, sidewall pinches/slices are a big hazard due to the "radial bulge" of modern tires, but that can be overcome in several ways.
 

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Traverse is not a off roader or never will be no matter how it's modified. Dirt roads are not off road an it does fine there. My '20 HC has a tilt / angle gauge option in the speedo display, WTF who are they kidding.
It's like going hiking with dress shoes on.
Off road is a specialty niche vehicle, when you need a Jeep, old school Blazer or Bronco that's what you need. Use the tool that's meant for the job.
 
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When I was young we took an old car Ford 1950 apart and kept only the frame and the front seat. It was the best off road car to venture in the woods etc.
 

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Traverse is not a off roader or never will be no matter how it's modified. Dirt roads are not off road an it does fine there. My '20 HC has a tilt / angle gauge option in the speedo display, WTF who are they kidding.
It's like going hiking with dress shoes on.
Off road is a specialty niche vehicle, when you need a Jeep, old school Blazer or Bronco that's what you need. Use the tool that's meant for the job.
You are in a different stage in life than most. My dad, who is also retirement age, says the same kind of stuff. He forgets what it was like to be young and poor and have a family and you want your vehicle to provide some mild off road fun but still be good to drive 15 hours to Disney. I totally understand why people want to do make these vehicles even better for their desires.
 

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You are in a different stage in life than most. My dad, who is also retirement age, says the same kind of stuff. He forgets what it was like to be young and poor and have a family and you want your vehicle to provide some mild off road fun but still be good to drive 15 hours to Disney. I totally understand why people want to do make these vehicles even better for their desires.
Not so much a different stage but with modern design complexity and electronics its harder to modify without other issues coming into play.
Lifting CV suspensions causes a lot more issues with shaft angles for example. Lifting a GM pickup requires a subframe to keep front dif. low enough to maintain driveline angles from being too severe and breaking like crazy not to mention having enough alignment adjustability to keep tires wearing OK. I have a friend who bought one lifted and it's always spitting out parts, looks cool but not worth it and not a daily dependable driver.
 

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When I was young we took an old car Ford 1950 apart and kept only the frame and the front seat. It was the best off road car to venture in the woods etc.
Yep a good 'ol field car. Had friend who I helped tear the body off a early '60's 4 door Galaxy from behind the front seat to the rear bumper. 6 cyl. and 3 on the tree and it was great fun tearing around the farm. Less body made for great fishtailing or was it early drifting. Recap snow tires for traction.
 

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Not so much a different stage but with modern design complexity and electronics its harder to modify without other issues coming into play.
Lifting CV suspensions causes a lot more issues with shaft angles for example. Lifting a GM pickup requires a subframe to keep front dif. low enough to maintain driveline angles from being too severe and breaking like crazy not to mention having enough alignment adjustability to keep tires wearing OK. I have a friend who bought one lifted and it's always spitting out parts, looks cool but not worth it and not a daily dependable driver.
I agree and have quite a bit of experience lifting IFS vehicles. The IRS throws another curveball in. But for very mild lifts, 1" sometimes up to 2" I have not seen unusually high failure rates for CV axles and camber bolts/adjustable control arms/etc. can be used to get everything back into camber spec. On the old R50 Pathfinders, quite a few people ran 6" subframe drop lifts with very few issues after getting everything dialed in.
 

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When I looked at the Tahoe in 2018 the cargo space was half that of the Traverse and miles per gallon was 16 mpg versus 22-24 with the Traverse. The ride was also much better with the Traverse, even better than my Mercedes coupe.

The Traverse is an AWD vehicle that is made for traveling on dirt roads or gravel roads or on snow with more tractions and control than a 2WD SUV. If you want to really go off the road then get a 4x4 Jeep Wrangler or Toyota or Land Rover vehicle, as they are engineered for that type of use. Off the road or even on forest service trails I want as narrow a vehicle with as short a wheelbase and tight a turning radius as possible.

We are fortunate to be living at a time when so much purpose built options for vehicles are available, though we do have to take the time to do a little bit of research and best to do so before making a purchase.
 
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