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Discussion Starter #1
I see that the battery is not under the hood but that there is still a positive terminal near the fusebox under the hood. It appears there may also be a ground screw facing the positive battery terminal.
My guess is that I can place the trickle charger on that positive post of the fuse box and that ground screw.
But I could just use any metal part for the ground of the trickle charger right?

Is that the best way to trickle charge this vehicles battery?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Looking around again, I found the actual labeled ground to the left.
10209
 

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yup- just make sure theres no corrosion buildup that would cause a bad connection.
Take a small wire brush to both- and then youll have nice shiny connections
 

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Wanna do it the right and easy way ... here's what you should get - have used them on all my collector cars, motorcycle and watercraft when I had one ... can secure the connections to those posts and then 'plug' in when you pull into your garage at night .... had a Corvette Delco battery that lasted 20 years on this! HArley battery 20 too
 

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2x Stingray.
My whole part time fleet is quick disconnect and always 10+ yrs on batteries. At 10 yrs I change them out on age, they still crank up fine though. New ones do turn over faster though.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Excellent ideas. I shall consider them all. I noticed as well that since I've been using trickle chargers, batteries are lasting twice the number of years.
 

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I am using batteryminder plus on all my batteries little cheaper
 

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Discussion Starter #11
If your buying a trickle charger, look for one that will desulfate the plates...

View attachment 10214

View attachment 10215
Are these pulses ok for electronics that are behind a converter?
I would imagine pulses are ok for any 12v devices by default since they aren't behind a converter, but I am wondering about 120v items that may be plugged into a converter that's fed off the 12v accessory port.
Would it be possible that those 12v pulses are being converted into 120v pulses that could damage sensitive electronics like your laptop, etc.?
 

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I see that the battery is not under the hood but that there is still a positive terminal near the fusebox under the hood. It appears there may also be a ground screw facing the positive battery terminal.
My guess is that I can place the trickle charger on that positive post of the fuse box and that ground screw.
But I could just use any metal part for the ground of the trickle charger right?

Is that the best way to trickle charge this vehicles battery?
If you want to go directly to the battery it is in the floor behind the passenger seat.
 

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I see that the battery is not under the hood but that there is still a positive terminal near the fusebox under the hood. It appears there may also be a ground screw facing the positive battery terminal.
My guess is that I can place the trickle charger on that positive post of the fuse box and that ground screw.
But I could just use any metal part for the ground of the trickle charger right?

Is that the best way to trickle charge this vehicles battery?
 

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I see that the battery is not under the hood but that there is still a positive terminal near the fusebox under the hood. It appears there may also be a ground screw facing the positive battery terminal.
My guess is that I can place the trickle charger on that positive post of the fuse box and that ground screw.
But I could just use any metal part for the ground of the trickle charger right?

Is that the best way to trickle charge this vehicles battery?
A standard 1.5 or 2 amp trickle charger isn’t going to do the job unless it’s hooked directly to the battery because of the power loss due to the cable length. Make sure you use a quality charger capable of 10 amps that will shut off when the battery is topped off if you want to charge from under the hood. Don’t buy one of those Harbor Freight tools chargers. Get a Schauer or similar.
 

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The best way I have found is through the "cigarette" lighter port. I purchased a battery tender and wired it to a 12v Male adapter. Plug it in and it charges the battery....no need to lift the hood. See pics
10217
10218
 

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Did you put a diode inside the 12V cigarette male adaptor? You don't want the car battery pushing power into the charger. On the other note, how you string the AC powerline into the vehicle?
 

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Did you put a diode inside the 12V cigarette male adaptor? You don't want the car battery pushing power into the charger. On the other note, how you string the AC powerline into the vehicle?
There's no diode when you hook directly to the battery, so why would you need a diode going through the cigarette lighter?
 

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Did you put a diode inside the 12V cigarette male adaptor? You don't want the car battery pushing power into the charger. On the other note, how you string the AC powerline into the vehicle?
No diode needed, just a standard trickle charger that you hook up directly to a battery or in this case via the 12v cigarette port. I have it parked in the garage and rarely use it; got tired of having a dead battery when I did want to use it. I just have a drop cord running into the open drivers window. Has been working great for the past 8 months.
 

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There's no diode when you hook directly to the battery, so why would you need a diode going through the cigarette lighter?
I have a solar trickle charger connected to my 98 Safari and it has a diode inside the male adaptor to prevent the power going back to the solar panel. If you connect a charger to a battery that is only a single source of input power. The battery is wired to the cigarette lighter and the lighter socket is designed to perform as an outlet. If you put a charger there, then you have power going in and at the same time power going in from the battery. Boom.... that is my understanding. Correct me if I am wrong.
 

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Well, you're right and wrong.

This time you stated that your solar charger has a diode INSIDE. Regular trickle chargers also have diodes (or similar blocking circuits) INSIDE. But the average user has no clue that there's a diode inside; he never opens it up - he just hooks the two wires to the battery.

Since charging through the cigarette lighter is basically the same as hooking up directly to the battery (electrically speaking, because the lighter doesn't care which way the electrons flow), there is no need to "add a diode" simply because he's running it through the lighter. He simply hooks up his two wires to the lighter's wires (via the plug) just as he would have hooked them to the battery.

Put another way: It doesn't matter whether you hook directly to the battery or to the cigarette lighter, the flow path is ultimately the same, so if you need a diode one way, you'll need it the other way.

Many people use a 9 volt transistor battery hooked to the cigarette lighter to backfeed the main 12 volt bus to maintain their electronic systems "memory" while they remove and replace the battery. The 9 volts is just enough to keep the memory in the radio and other components with memories, like seat and mirror positions. No diode needed.
 
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