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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, I searched and didnt find anything.

So let me start by saying this is always a thread that people have strong opinions about. I personally do not wear my seatbelt..... yes I know I should, yes I know it is safer, yes I know it could save my life. Just not into the government forcing me to wear my seat belt or local government giving tickets to raise money. NOT trying to be a jerk! :)

With that being said, anyone know how to disable the seatbelt chime? I have a 2005 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited as my other car, had no issues turing the chime off. Anyone done this?

Thanks!
 

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I don't believe you can disable the chime because you should always be wearing your seatbelt. That's why the chime exists. What is your reason for not wearing one? Takes too long? Too safe? Do you have kids? Do you really think thats a good example to set?

I can see you one day being ejected from your car and as you fly through the air you shrug and say "meh, it was worth it" just as your skull shatters into tiny pieces.

You're a moron ok guy. Thanks for asking this question
 

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I looked over the owners manual and could not find where it says to disable the seatbelt chime.

I never used to wear my seatbelt until I got a Jeep Wrangler. Good thing too, I was driving home from college and hit a patch of ice on the highway and flipped it several times down a ditch...wear them now.

I wear my belt in my Vue & Ranger, but disabled the chime in the Ranger...it is annoying!!! Any little noise really bothers me, from an unnecessary chime to change rattling.

What you do in your car is your own personal preference and I will not pass on my opinions.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
intotheoh said:
I can see you one day being ejected from your car and as you fly through the air you shrug and say "meh, it was worth it" just as your skull shatters into tiny pieces.

You're a moron ok guy. Thanks for asking this question
Exactly what I was expecting, thanks for being a decent person and not an idiot. Even if I wore my seatbelt someone might find this information helpful as some people choose to do things differently in life... somepeople smoke, some people drink, somepeople do things that are not safe or healthy... good thing they have you to come up with non-witty comments.

In any event I apricate your responses... If I find a solution to the seatbelt chime I will post it.... as this is an internet forum about information on the Traverse.... surly I am not the only "moron" as you state that may want to turn that feature off.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
MIC said:
I looked over the owners manual and could not find where it says to disable the seatbelt chime.

I never used to wear my seatbelt until I got a Jeep Wrangler. Good thing too, I was driving home from college and hit a patch of ice on the highway and flipped it several times down a ditch...wear them now.

I wear my belt in my Vue & Ranger, but disabled the chime in the Ranger...it is annoying!!! Any little noise really bothers me, from an unnecessary chime to change rattling.

What you do in your car is your own personal preference and I will not pass on my opinions.
Thanks for your response, I too did not see anything in the manual. Glad you made it out of that acident in one piece!
 

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My MIL does not wear hers for medical reasons. She just has the belt buckled up behind her.
 

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To each his own. You can decide not to wear a seatbelt and I have the right to think you're an idiot.
 

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intotheoh said:
To each his own. You can decide not to wear a seatbelt and I have the right to think you're an idiot.
Okay kiddies....don't need to flame each other....

Just like his choice to not wear a seatbelt is his, I would also like to have the choice not to wear a helmet on my motorcycle....but in Canada, you don't have that choice....

The way I figure is if you are flying down the highway on your bike and come off one way or another you could be toast with or without....but hey....we all take chances every day.......the minute you wake up and step outside your
front door, your day is already riddled with possibilities....

Just my opinion....
 

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Riding without a helmet is just as smart as not using a seatbelt. You could easily get killed in a low speed accident without a helmet. :police:
 

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Not only do I own a motorcycle, but I also race cars at local track days. Not to toot my own horn, but I consider myself a very good driver who takes plenty of risks. That being said, I chose to minimize risks whenever possible. Even I make mistakes.

When I ride my motorcycle I ALWAYS wear a full face helmet, kevlar reinforced jacket, pants and boots. When I am at a track day I use a safety harness and helmet there too. I have never fallen off my bike, but I see news reports of it every day. Seattle is a pretty bike friendly city. Surprisingly, a crash is pretty survivable if you know how to manage it. Its your choice if you want to break a leg or also break your head and live as a vegetable for the rest of your life.

The point of a seatbelt is to keep you safe. Its not a government conspiracy to get money from you. Heaven forbid they have laws designed to keep you safe and keep my insurance premiums down.

Frankly Im pretty shocked there is noone else on this forum that finds the lackadaisical attitude toward seat belts absolutely infuriating. Sure I could be less crude, but why bother? When the day comes, and believe me, it will, that you get in a car accident and are seriously injured in what would have otherwise been a minor accident, will you still have the same attitude? You see - the road is full of drivers making their own choices every day. Some choose to drive a Traverse, others a Ford. Some choose to speed and run yellow lights, others cruise 5 miles under. Some obey the law and wear a seatbelt and others don't. No matter who you think you are or how defensively you drive one day you will be in an accident because when left to their own free will people do stupid things, like cut you off (or don't wear a seatbelt).
 

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I think others on the forum also find it infuriating, but there is no point in voicing your opinion to someone without a brain :banghead:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Wow... who knew a simple question would cause such an outrage....I am flattered that you all care so much about what I do with my personal life that does not affect you. We can fight this till we are blue in the face, we dont see eye to eye... no need for me to call someone a moron or idiot (oh wait I didn't, that was you...classy might I add).

But we do see eye to eye on one thing.... seatbelts save lifes. As I stated in my original post I understand that. What I dont understand is why a police officer can pull me over for doing nothing except not wearing a seat belt. Seems to me he should be pulling people over who actually are doing something that can injure OTHER people, like drunk drivers. You would have thought I asked how to drive the Traverse while being drunk off my a$$.

I found this artice interesting.... yes, I am sure for every artice like this there is one that states your point of view. However if you think a seat belt law is about anything other then generating revenue I think you are the crazy one! Case in point, it is illegal to not wear a helmet in the state of Michigan, however if you take a trip to the secretary of State and pay a fee they will allow you to ride without a helmet.... Seems they dont care about my saftey at all, only my money! Article will follow on my next post.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Who's the bigger threat to your safety, a murderer or someone who attempts suicide? The answer is obvious, and we'd certainly jeer any mayor who suggested lowering a city's death toll by cracking down on suicides. Yet something strange happens when death comes to the highway. Politicians lock arms with law enforcement, and come up with campaigns like "Click It or Ticket," which began Monday and aims to reduce highway fatalities through stricter seat belt law enforcement. Suddenly, the murder-suicide distinction vanishes, and it's perfectly acceptable to reduce deaths by punishing those who put only themselves at risk.

Like other do-gooder efforts that plead with us to turn off our TVs or put down our cigarettes, Click It or Ticket rolls around once every year (May 24 to June 6). But unlike many other campaigns, CIOT doesn't stop with pleading. Cops from over 12,000 law enforcement agencies scope out violators, set up checkpoints and mete out fines as high as $200. In order to emphasize the seriousness of their intentions, they've even adopted the hallmark of all ham-fisted safety crusades-zero tolerance. As one police chief put it: "America should be on notice-Click It or Ticket. No exceptions. No excuses. No warnings."

But why waste cops' time with seatbelt laws? After all, laws shouldn't protect careless people from themselves, they should protect the peaceful from the dangerous. CIOT supporters figure that since so many people die because they refuse to wear seatbelts, the government could save many lives by strapping them in with laws. The implicit rationale is that all of last year's 43,220 highway deaths were equally tragic.

But if an adult does something risky-like tightrope walking, smoking or driving without a seatbelt-that person alone is responsible for the consequences. And since drivers who don't buckle up aren't making anyone else less safe, laws that bear down on these people don't make other motorists any safer either. We should be allowed to ruin our own lives, but we shouldn't be allowed to ruin the lives of others. So, yes, it's tragic when someone dies because he refused to wear a seatbelt, but it's much more tragic when a reckless driver kills innocent people. Public policy should not concern itself with decreasing all highway deaths, but with decreasing the deaths of innocents.

Even though fans of individual liberty often (and rightly) decry the paternalism embedded in seatbelt laws, most Americans take little offense at such state-sponsored nannying. However, nannying does not just make us less free; when it distracts law enforcement from its proper role, it can also make us less safe. When government assumes many duties, it's tougher to do the important ones right.

Government officials are more on the mark when they call for enforcement of drunk driving laws. But here again law should focus on recklessness, whether it's encouraged by alcohol, fatigue, general stupidity or high-speed lipstick application.

Forty-nine states have seatbelt laws , and in many cases, the laws allow officers to pull over motorists whose only crime is not wearing a seatbelt. While the officer takes time to give the seatbelt scofflaw a scolding and a ticket, plenty of other drivers embark on the kind of harebrained maneuvering that often ends with a reckless driver colliding into a good driver. It's these red-light-running , left-turn-at-any-cost daredevils who enrage and endanger good drivers.

And seat belt laws come with their own set of unintended consequences, which further complicates the principle that policy should protect the peaceful people from the dangerous. Seat belt laws may make drivers and children safer, but economists such as Christopher Garbacz suggest that greater safety can make drivers more comfortable with dangerous driving, which puts the lives of more innocents-like pedestrians, cyclists and other passengers-in jeopardy. Risk assessment researchers have long pondered this paradox, and some have even suggested (only half jokingly) that the best way to promote cautious driving would be to attach a twelve-inch buck knife to all steering wheels.

Of course, the government's crusade to convert the unbuckled does not stop with seatbelt laws. For decades, mandates have forced automakers to take up the cause. At one point, interlocks actually prevented drivers from starting their cars if their seatbelts weren't snapped on. Public outrage spurred Congress to outlaw such mandates, but the crusade continued.

Today government-mandated lights, chimes and text messages hector drivers when they turn the ignition, and often all the ringing and flashing doesn't stop when the car starts. In many models, chime and light seatbelt reminders can persist for up to five minutes, and safety pushers have even decided to take another stab at interlocks. A proposal before Congress would up the agitation ante by mandating "entertainment interlocks," where drivers could listen to the stereo only if they buckled up.

The good news is that most of us do buckle up. About 80 percent of Americans use seatbelts, a decision probably based less on government nagging than on a simple understanding of the safety benefits. After all, the word is out-seatbelts make you safer. We get it. Why wage an ever-intensifying campaign against the remaining holdouts?

Perhaps one day regulators will understand that -even when armed with all the facts-some people will still choose risky behavior. Instead of saving us from ourselves, regulators should take a deep breath, allow beltless motorists to put themselves at risk, and go hassle the dangerous drivers
 

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What about the cost of caring for these seat-belt-rebels while they sit drooling in a wheelchair for thirty years? Where do you suppose that will come from? ???
 

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Ok back on topic-

What about the passenger chime. Or is that the chime in general. My mom usually goes to Macy's shopping and I dont wanna go (Im 14), and she gets annoyed when she buckles up, but the passenger chime is ringing

Can that be disabled?
 

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Er.... the passenger chimes are disabled when the seat is unoccupied
 

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Well, I have read all this and must say Tiestosteele and his rationale is all wet ( can't say full of s*** ). If he choose suicide, I'll supply his ammo.

Seat belt laws not only protect the "non thinking" individual from himself, the seat belt law protects the "non thinking" individual from all of us and our wallets.

I lost a cousin in an auto accident because the cause of the accident ( a non seatbelt wearing individual, don't want to say moron here ) was severly injured after he bouced around inside his car like a pinball after an grazing impact with a wall, the "non thinker" could not get behind the wheel again, in time, before hitting my cousin and killing her .... head on.

Now, she is dead, the "non thinking" driver who "didn't need a seat belt" sits in a wheel chair and droools, while all of our insurance rates go up to care for this "non thinker". Let's not forget the law suit my cousins family won ....our ever increasing insurance rates paid for that also.

Thanks Mr Tiestosteele for your neglectful attitude and actions. Ill watch the papers for your wreck to yourself and our society.

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #18
It is so exhausting that any discussion of disabling the babysitter / lawyer / liability / "you're an idiot" mode of GM vehicles DRLs, auto headlights, setabelt chimes, can't use Nav while driving, etc... turns into, why would this idiot want to do that? I have helped many people turn off their cant use nav while driving mode in their jeeps, I guess that makes me a bad person too?

Maybe DRLs are good, maybe they are bad, maybe some states pull you over for not having them, maybe some states don't, maybe they make it harder to notice motorcycles, maybe not, maybe they use more power and fuel, maybe not. Maybe they won't let me into Canada without them, maybe they will. I don't care. If someone asks how to disable something, why can't we discuss that instead of the merits of such a decision.

To get back on topic, to help inform other idiots out there that might want to drive to a neighbors house without being chimed to death, or take off thier belt once they are seconds before the driveway it appears you can simply disconnect the electrical connector from the seat belt harness and it will not register anylonger. Still looking into the situation and will let you all know what I find.

Anyone else that wants to jump on the bandwagon please do so, doesn't bother me at all.... I will find a solution and will pass it along... It is your choice to disable or not.
 

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Tiestosteele -
you can go to the dealer and buy a seat belt extender for about 7 dollars. Once you have that just cut the excess crap off and keep it latched.
 

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"Anyone else that wants to jump on the bandwagon please do so, doesn't bother me at all.... I will find a solution and will pass it along... It is your choice to disable or not."


And that, in fact, is the problem, isn't it? Certainly, you are the problem and not the solution.
 
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