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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
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The Wifey is out doing her Black Friday thang.... she calls me somewhere between Home Depot and Target to tell me that the 2020 Traverse just flipped 50k miles. Never seen the dealer since the day we picked it up. Not one leak, rattle, or squeek. Runs better than the day we got it. ROCK SOLID vehicle. Only thing besides fluids and filters is a set of tires and one wiper blade ......
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At 75k miles, I'll toss in a set of sparkplugs and 3 new coils on the backside ( no access side) and then every 75k after that do the plugs and new coils on the backside and move the backside coils to the front side. Wifey says she's never giving up the Trans-Hoe......as she calls it ( She's driven only Tahoe's....for like, forever)
 

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At 75k miles, I'll toss in a set of sparkplugs and 3 new coils on the backside ( no access side) and then every 75k after that do the plugs and new coils on the backside and move the backside coils to the front side. Wifey says she's never giving up the Trans-Hoe......as she calls it ( She's driven only Tahoe's....for like, forever)
What are the advantages for doing the swap like that? Don't they wear out about the same?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
The ones is the back are a b*tch to get to..... if a front one ever fails, it's a 10 minute job. I always put in coils when access is a problem. Coils are about $55 each.... I save $175 by not doing the fronts. Coils are pretty reliable.

These are the ones in the back, against the firewall and under the intake manifold.
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Mmm... Bob, why not wait until they failed, plugs are good for 100,000 miles? The amount of work doesn't change unless you worry about the plugs will seize up on you then it makes sense to me. Of course there is nothing wrong with proactive maintenance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
When you've seen as many threads come out of cylinder heads WITH THE PLUGS as I have when pulling them at 100k or more....you would do them at 75K too ( although these were mostly Ford engines). I also change my Duramax glow plugs periodically too. I've seen WAY too many glow plugs snap off, and then your pulling the head to fix it, (so now your pulling both heads because puling only one head is stupid.) Swapping out Spark plugs early.... is cheap insurance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
OR...... the one piece plug turns into a 2 piece plug. This is another "ruined weekend" (The new plugs should get slathered up pretty good with anti-seize before they go in....)

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My 3.6 'nox is at 90k and it's due for plugs. Waiting for misfires before changing is not worth the risk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Changing plugs every 100k miles is 3 changes in 300k miles.

Changing plugs at 75k miles is 4 changes in 300k miles.

I'm changing at 75k miles worry free miles, for the win!!
 

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👍 I wish my vehicle can last that long. The miles I can rake up is low nowadays, if I am lucky I can change the plugs two times. I will be to old to change the plugs the third time let alone the forth. 😊
 

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The plug manufacturers tell you NOT to use antiseize on their plugs as it will impact the torque reading on install.
 
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Show me the video of you torquing your sparkplugs.... I'll wait right here....:sneaky::sneaky::sneaky:
I'm only telling you what NGK tells its customers.

I used anti seize on iron headed motors in the past. Did so the first couple times on my LS 21 years ago. Then found out it was inadvisable and have not done since. Never had a plug take out the threads, and did both of my Traverse's and several other GM's at just over 100k. Torqued them just fine ;)

Just because something was common practice 40 years ago does not mean it hasn't changed.

Some fasteners are meant to be torqued dry for proper reading. OTOH ARP requires their head bolts to be torqued with specific lube to be done properly. I listen to what the manufacturer tells me. Not sure why that would prompt a laugh...
 
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I agree with early change. Changed plugs and wires on my 09 v8 Colorado around 95K figuring I'm close to 100k even though the truck ran just fine. On my test drive, couldn't believe the difference in idle and performance. I don't know about 75k, but I wouldn't wait until manufacture change mileage. Same for all other maintenance schedules.
 

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The plug manufacturers tell you NOT to use anti seize on their plugs as it will impact the torque reading on install.
I torque them until hand tight without trying to strip them. Never had a problem. I've never put a torque wrench on a spark plug in over 50 years! I always use anti seize and the next change always goes smoothly.
 
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