Traverse Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just bought a 2020 Chevy traverse lt...unfortunately I didn’t realize it didn’t have blind spot assist which is a must for my wife’s health issue (neck).

I tried to get the dealer to let me swap out if I paid a depreciation fee since it’s only been a a day since I bought it. But no luck.

Is there a kit oem that I can buy to add it?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
I just bought a 2020 Chevy traverse lt...unfortunately I didn’t realize it didn’t have blind spot assist which is a must for my wife’s health issue (neck).

I tried to get the dealer to let me swap out if I paid a depreciation fee since it’s only been a a day since I bought it. But no luck.

Is there a kit oem that I can buy to add it?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I just bought a 2020 Chevy traverse lt...unfortunately I didn’t realize it didn’t have blind spot assist which is a must for my wife’s health issue (neck).

I tried to get the dealer to let me swap out if I paid a depreciation fee since it’s only been a a day since I bought it. But no luck.

Is there a kit oem that I can buy to add it?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I have noticed the space between the passenger side window and windshield can hide a car, if you are moving at same time, you will not see it until you are too close. but I have gotten used to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Prior to the safety features, I took a company drivers course and we were taught many things but the important one were side blind spots and parking in crowded parking lots to prevent rear end bumps. For the blind spots, I positioned my side mirrors way out to oncoming cars as they approach on the side of the car or in the blind spot along side of your car. While a long ways back behind you, I used my rearview mirror. example, adjust your side mirrors far left/away or out from the side of the car. I know this sounds weird since we typically adjust the side mirror to see along side of the car. You should not see any part of the side of the car. As the oncoming traffic/cars coming toward you on either side, use the rearview mirror for the distance, and as the traffic/cars approach the car (if the mirrors are out far enough) you can view the traffic/car in both mirrors at the same time eliminating the blind spot. You'll see the front of the car in the side mirror and the back of the car in the rearview mirror at the same time. No need to turn your head, which is crazy because it's a habit from the mirrors being adjusted incorrectly. Your wife will have to adjust the side mirrors until see can see the same car in both mirrors. It actually works but takes time to adjust. Once the car is totally seen in the side mirror and not in the rearview mirror, you can then see the car from the corner of your eye (peripheral vision) and not having to turn your head. Sounds crazy but works. Hope this helps a little until you get your options,

Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
19SatVerse--Thanks for sharing. My father-in-law taught me this trick about 20 years ago and it truly works! Takes some getting used to, but worth it!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
I have the blind-spot on my Traverse but I still added small 2" concave mirrors to both of the side mirrors. I can quickly see if anything is to the sides of the vehicle. I also have the option on mine of using the selector lever on the rear view mirror to activate the display of the rear camera.

There is no cooling off period with a motor vehicle sale. Once you accept delivery of the vehicle and drive it home it is yours. People are incredibly lazy. When I bought my 2018 Traverse I checked the invoice when it was produced by the factory and checked the VIN online and then when it arrived at the dealer I did a full inspection and a test drive. I found that there were minor problems and I told the sales manager that they needed to be fixed before I would accept delivery of the vehicle. They wanted me to drive it home and make an appointment but I knew better than to do that and insisted they get everything corrected before I accepted the vehicle.

I had to do the same with the 2011 Silverado 2500HD Duramax I bought from a dealer that was located more than 90 miles from my house. The dealer changed out the rear view mirrors for tow mirrors and added running boards. When tens of thousands of dollars are at stake I make the time to do the purchase transaction properly.

At this point all the OP can do is either sell the Traverse on Craigslist or use it as a trade-in with a Chevy dealer and buy a new Traverse. Something I always do is take the time to put together a Request for Quote that details ALL the specifications for the vehicle. I use it to compare to the build sheet(s) from the dealer and again with the factory invoice and again when I go to inspect the vehicle at the dealer. And I always do a test drive of the vehicle before signing off on the paperwork and taking possession of the vehicle.

It is also a good idea to check the fluid levels as the adding of brake fluid and coolant and transmission fluid is often done by a prep person at the dealer and they can screw this up. My 2011 truck was delivered I found that the ATF was down by nearly a quart.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top