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Curious if everyone thinks that the brake feeling on these new Traverses are weak or not? I came from a 2017 Traverse and the feeling is much weaker on the new one. Just seems like I have to push down more to get the truck to stop. After week in of "owning" the Traverse I drove my son's 2019 Kia Optima and that car has very responsive brakes. Granted it's a smaller vehicle but the feeling just gives one much more confidence in stopping. Switching back to the Traverse I felt like I had 200K on the original brakes. It actually feels dangerous. I called the dealer and asked about this and they said that the new Traverse uses a new vacuum brake system and may not be as responsive as the older Traverse. I actually scheduled an appt at the dealer to take a look but cancelled. Figured I'll ask you guys/gals to see if this is the feeling everyone else is experiencing.
 

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I have not noticed the brakes to be weak. Compared to our 2012 Outback, which had really weak breaks, these are nice. Also, don't confuse brake peddle effort with brake performance. Needing a bit more pressure on the pedal isn't bad, I don't like super touchy brakes. That said, these seem average.
 

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I've noticed no difference whatsoever in stopping effort between my '15 and the '18, or the different weight class '18 Malibu, or the '16 Silverado for that matter! Indicative of well designed GM systems with the proper amount of pedal assist effort to modulate brake pressure throughout safe stopping distances.



And low effort braking or sensitive braking is definitely not good braking. Discovered by many in the 60's where all you needed was your big toe stop a 3 ton behemoth as advertised...."on a dime". In operation a quick push in an emergency caused skidding usually resulted in placing a steering wheel dent in the drivers head with passengers kissing the metal dash or the windshield! (Probably why most driver wore hats in those pre-seatbelt days...helped to cushion the blow when you hit a sudden bump and your head hit the roof.)



Let's not confuse weak brakes with weak feet or poor driving habits:


It's normal for brakes on a new vehicle to require more effort to stop until pads are broken in and make final contact with 100% of their surface area upon the rotors. Repeated hard stops on new linings in a foolish attempt to seat them faster will only result in glazing and hardening the pads, ruining them resulting in longer lasting, sometimes squeaky pads requiring more stopping effort.


Also the valve action on new VVT engines develops less available vacuum the induction system for a sufficient full time supply to the power booster under all driving conditions, especially when pumping or riding the brake chews up the reserve. Even the Traverse's electrical vacuum assist pump to supplement reduced engine vacuum may not be able to compensate for poor driving habits. (A faulty assist pump could also cause the feeling of harder braking, but such failure would pop up an accompanying DIC information message)


I find the comparison of the new Traverse to a Kia funny because I just test drove a bunch of them.......it's good to be retired with time on my hands. Seems KIA currently made the mistake of offering $50 bucks for taking test rides..... like a red flag to a bull.....filled out two for the two addresses and made $100 bucks spending a day breaking ba!!s at two dealerships plus tanked up the Silvy with cheap out of State gas and myself with free coffee. Test road all their "top line" stuff including Optimas and Santa Fe Ultimate XLs. Kias....found their braking systems easy to modulate and less effective in comparison, but these were new vehicles with "green" linings.



Also noted Kias are cheaper than their similarly equipped big three counterparts....for a reason....as F. Gump would say "cheap is as cheap does"!

Think I'll throw their $100 toward purchase of a lighted bowtie for the Silvy.
 

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To the original poster, I was thinking the same thing. Been driving a 2016 then 2019 Ford Edge, brakes are a touch grabby at slow (driveway) speeds, but smooth and responsive at normal speeds. 2008 Caddy STS, drives and stops with authority. 2009 GMC Yukon Hybird. Big heavy car stops as you would expect with standard pedal effort.

2019 Traverse, 5000miles.. It feels like you need more foot to stop "normally" I always seem to not decelerate as much as i would expect with the pedal effort. So I agree that they feel like they don't brake well, in reality, if you stand on it, it stops.. Just need to train myself to use a little more foot!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
To the original poster, I was thinking the same thing. Been driving a 2016 then 2019 Ford Edge, brakes are a touch grabby at slow (driveway) speeds, but smooth and responsive at normal speeds. 2008 Caddy STS, drives and stops with authority. 2009 GMC Yukon Hybird. Big heavy car stops as you would expect with standard pedal effort.

2019 Traverse, 5000miles.. It feels like you need more foot to stop "normally" I always seem to not decelerate as much as i would expect with the pedal effort. So I agree that they feel like they don't brake well, in reality, if you stand on it, it stops.. Just need to train myself to use a little more foot!
Exactly my experience. Ok, seems like "As Designed" I guess.
 

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I have similar experiences as the original poster. Now at 7 months with 6,000 miles on a 2019. At low speeds, brakes are difficult to modulate/grabby and for the first time, wife complains of me making abrupt stops at stop signs and lights. At speed, it doesn’t slow down as expected and have to really press down when needing only moderate slowing down from 50mph with only me in the vehicle without cargo. Had better performance with a 99 CRV with rear drum brakes or a slightly larger moving truck or a loaded Toyota Sienna. Would be interested to find out if anybody has tried switching to a different brake pad type and have noticed any difference. Are the original brakes ceramic?
 

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I don’t think the brakes are week but I have found that they seem to heat up fast and then don’t perform that well. Worse in the heat. Drove though Death Valley last August and it was 120° out and the hills were hard to deal with.
 

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I don’t think the brakes are week but I have found that they seem to heat up fast and then don’t perform that well. Worse in the heat. Drove though Death Valley last August and it was 120° out and the hills were hard to deal with.
Several car reviews said the same, that the car's brakes were overheating on prolonged use, such as in downhill descents. That they recommended downshifting and using engine braking to relieve the heat and stress on the brakes.
 

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Several car reviews said the same, that the car's brakes were overheating on prolonged use, such as in downhill descents. That they recommended downshifting and using engine braking to relieve the heat and stress on the brakes.


This is what I end up doing just sucks since you have to come out of cruse for it work properly. Also always been a fan of using consumable items to slow down (rotors and pads) rather than the engine. :)
 

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What is the diameter on the rear rotor on the gen2. I know that the gen 1 are 13 inches diameter but cannot find the specifications on the gen 2. I was parked beside a 2018 at the shopping center last week and they seemed smaller in size but cannot confirm 100%.
 

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I had been driving my Silverado 2500HD for the past two weeks and then got into the Traverse and started to back down my driveway and nearly hit the wall as the brakes were very slow to respond. I had been driving the Traverse a great deal and mentally I had adjusted to the way the brakes work.

The power assist is much slower to engage with the Traverse and do not know if the pistons are not sized properly or it is the pump that is inadequate but it does leave a lot to be desired nonetheless.
 

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.02 Tired of reading all this weak brake nonsense.



Maybe I have a good one or maybe proper driving habits compensate, but I've trailered the jet ski in both the Silvy and the Traverse down the 1-1/2 mile long 7 degree downgrade to the Shenandoah on Rte. 340 and no weak brakes here, no downshifting, no overheating and no fading. Can't speak for doing the same in 120 deg temps in Death Valley, and have to make the run at under 45 mph or a guaranteed ticket at the foot of the hill.


Rotors have cooling fins on the inside surface and if you down slow under the speed limit, allow to coast and cool, and reapply to slow repeatedly 4-5 times down the hill there is no problem with braking effort or fading. But a steady constant pressure on the brake all the way down is a guaranteed overheat and fade on the any vehicle. Re; another comment having to disengage cruise control by braking - on this hill, trailering and not to brake and disengage is insanity.


Driving this way I see no difference in brake performance in the Traverse compared the Silverado (even with primary grade braking disengaged and not using the Z71's secondary grade braking). I imagine there would be a difference due to limitations on both vehicles due to VVT design if someone foolishly constantly rides the brakes downhill and the vacuum supply runs out of steam. In certain conditions, the action of VVT starves engine vacuum used to apply boost assist to the power brake diaphragm and so auxiliary vacuum pumps are needed. Silvys have meaty 5.3/6.2l V8s and a crankshaft driven mechanical vacuum pump whereas the Traverse has a pi$$y 3.6 V6 with a tiny electric pump as the auxiliary. Keep constant pressure on the brake on a long run and the vacuum reservoir becomes exhausted and requires more braking and the pedal stiffens.....obviously happens much sooner on the Traverse. Not really a fair comparison against a non VVT with fixed valve timings maximizing engine supplied vacuum.



People say never buy first year's production.....give them a while to work the kinks out. Well, doesn't necessarily hold true with a properly designed people, using well tested and sourced parts using newly calibrated equipment and first line personnel. Something to be said about getting first week's production vehicle (serial #118). They must have been running the lines slower with all fully trained production people, newly calibrated equipment and robots, and QA and engineering checking production of units assembled with more reliable components sampled under a stricter MIL-SPEC sampling rate......essentially first article production subject to stricter standards. Odometer's turning 16K miles and almost time for another service visit to the dealer......for its 2 year safety inspection sticker! Only things done were oil/filter and air filter changes and adding crappy accessories..and it continues to perform flawlessly despite my kicking the crap out of it on early morning back road fun runs.
 
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.02 Tired of reading all this weak brake nonsense.



Maybe I have a good one or maybe proper driving habits compensate, but I've trailered the jet ski in both the Silvy and the Traverse down the 1-1/2 mile long 7 degree downgrade to the Shenandoah on Rte. 340 and no weak brakes here, no downshifting, no overheating and no fading. Can't speak for doing the same in 120 deg temps in Death Valley, and have to make the run at under 45 mph or a guaranteed ticket at the foot of the hill.


Rotors have cooling fins on the inside surface and if you down slow under the speed limit, allow to coast and cool, and reapply to slow repeatedly 4-5 times down the hill there is no problem with braking effort or fading. But a steady constant pressure on the brake all the way down is a guaranteed overheat and fade on the any vehicle. Re; another comment having to disengage cruise control by braking - on this hill, trailering and not to brake and disengage is insanity.


Driving this way I see no difference in brake performance in the Traverse compared the Silverado (even with primary grade braking disengaged and not using the Z71's secondary grade braking). I imagine there would be a difference due to limitations on both vehicles due to VVT design if someone foolishly constantly rides the brakes downhill and the vacuum supply runs out of steam. In certain conditions, the action of VVT starves engine vacuum used to apply boost assist to the power brake diaphragm and so auxiliary vacuum pumps are needed. Silvys have meaty 5.3/6.2l V8s and a crankshaft driven mechanical vacuum pump whereas the Traverse has a pi$$y 3.6 V6 with a tiny electric pump as the auxiliary. Keep constant pressure on the brake on a long run and the vacuum reservoir becomes exhausted and requires more braking and the pedal stiffens.....obviously happens much sooner on the Traverse. Not really a fair comparison against a non VVT with fixed valve timings maximizing engine supplied vacuum.



People say never buy first year's production.....give them a while to work the kinks out. Well, doesn't necessarily hold true with a properly designed people, using well tested and sourced parts using newly calibrated equipment and first line personnel. Something to be said about getting first week's production vehicle (serial #118). They must have been running the lines slower with all fully trained production people, newly calibrated equipment and robots, and QA and engineering checking production of units assembled with more reliable components sampled under a stricter MIL-SPEC sampling rate......essentially first article production subject to stricter standards. Odometer's turning 16K miles and almost time for another service visit to the dealer......for its 2 year safety inspection sticker! Only things done were oil/filter and air filter changes and adding crappy accessories..and it continues to perform flawlessly despite my kicking the crap out of it on early morning back road fun runs.


Only notice this on long drives with long downhills. Even letting Cruze take over you can feel the brakes heating up in the shutter it produces. (36k miles)

I am curious to see how those who have towed (no trailer brakes) have faired. I would think it could get difficult at times.
 

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Why are you riding the brakes on long downhills? Very few brakes will tolerate that without some rotor warping.

Downhills in this traverse with a 1200 lb jet ski/trailer behind is a dream. Slip it into L and use the gears to help control your downhill rate of speed. Yes, I will need to use the brakes on the steeper declines, but only for a fraction of the time if I left it in D.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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Rotors have internal fins on them to cool the brakes. Constantly riding the brake, any brake, will eventually produce more heat that the rotating fins can release. Lower gearing will take some load off the brakes, but they need a cooling off period so apply, slow down and release to cool before next brake application, keep repeating until on level and they won't overheat.


Cruise control does not take over like a substitute chauffeur and cruse control cannot slow down a car, it has only one function to accelerate the vehicle to the set point - absent pressing on the brake, gravity and wind resistance and road friction is what to counter maintain a constant speed..... absent periodic acceleration the car will slow down ....and going down a hill gravity will speed it up past the set point with the only real counter being the foot brake. Who relies cruise controlgoing down a hill anyway?
 

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Why are you riding the brakes on long downhills? Very few brakes will tolerate that without some rotor warping.

Downhills in this traverse with a 1200 lb jet ski/trailer behind is a dream. Slip it into L and use the gears to help control your downhill rate of speed. Yes, I will need to use the brakes on the steeper declines, but only for a fraction of the time if I left it in D.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk


Not sure I said I was ridding it. What I did say is leaving in cruse down long hills cause vibrations when the car slows it’s self down. Never had this issue in any other car. Also noticed on hot days there is fading to the brakes. Even in the reviews by C&D it’s noted as having brake fade. Normal driver not towing shouldn’t have to use low gears to slow down a car. Brake pads and rotors can be replaced, fixing gears is much more involved.
 

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Rotors have internal fins on them to cool the brakes. Constantly riding the brake, any brake, will eventually produce more heat that the rotating fins can release. Lower gearing will take some load off the brakes, but they need a cooling off period so apply, slow down and release to cool before next brake application, keep repeating until on level and they won't overheat.


Cruise control does not take over like a substitute chauffeur and cruse control cannot slow down a car, it has only one function to accelerate the vehicle to the set point - absent pressing on the brake, gravity and wind resistance and road friction is what to counter maintain a constant speed..... absent periodic acceleration the car will slow down ....and going down a hill gravity will speed it up past the set point with the only real counter being the foot brake. Who relies cruise controlgoing down a hill anyway?


For years cruise control has slowed cars down going down hills.....not sure what car you had before but my 2007 Ford Fusion, 2008 Pontiac G8, 2011 GMC Terrain, 2013 GMC Acadia, 2014 Chevy SS, 2015 Chevy SS, and now the 2018 Traverse will brake with engine and brakes to slow down a car on a hill. None of the cars above on the same hills have ever had brake fade like the Traverse. Also we are not talking about 7-9% mountain roads. We are talking about normal interstates that have a 2-4% grade.

Try it one day...I guess.
 

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Several review sites and mags commented on their experience with the new Traverse having brake fading/overheating on downhill descents and said it was a concern. Especially they said when it was just one or two people and some equipment in the vehicle for the review and it was occurring.

Their concern is when you have a full family and some cargo and it occurs downhill with inexperienced drivers...
 

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My 2017 Traverse is slowing down when on the cruise control going downhill to keep the setting speed I programmed. Same with my other former cars like my Uplander and my Impala.
 
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