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I want to use a floor jack and don't like jacking on the pinch welds. 1a auto says you can jack on the rear diff if you have awd, but what about the front?

Thanks, Ryan
 

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I want to use a floor jack and don't like jacking on the pinch welds. 1a auto says you can jack on the rear diff if you have awd, but what about the front?

Thanks, Ryan

SOL, There's no safe way to jack on the unit body other than the specific points in the manual, or the transaxle subfame without chance of damage. Other than flatbedding or tire strapping and vehicle can only be safely towed by attaching to the two specific reinforced slots in unitbody.



Only safe areas are reinfoirced unitbody rocker panels. Get a pinch weld adapter so there is no stress on the weld flap and all force is transmitted to the rocker........permits use of all hydraulic jacks so you don't have to play with the crapo jack in the trunk. Different types: slotted rubber hockey puck types and magnetic types that fit over the weld.
 

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On my 2017 I use a long piece of oak hardwood that fits behind the pinch weld and put my floor jack on the wood piece. Make sure that the wood is thicker and clear the pinch weld so you dont cause damages. I presume the system is similar than the 2017 gen one. You place the piece of wood at the same jacking points than the manual tells you. Mine are 10 inches long. No damages at all caused and no scratches on the paint.
 

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If you try to jack the front from one single place even the rear you can cause more damages that you dont need. Why not using the 4 points as stated in the manual.? Like this it will be more safe for you and your vshicle. Jacking from right behind the pinch weld with a strong wood piece is the safest way without causing damages.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I don't want to scratch the pinchweld. My wife has the vehicle at work right now, but I believe it is safe to jack from the rear differential.
 

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If your piece of wood is thick enough to clear the pinch by lets say one half inch your pinch weld will not be touched and no scratches. Trust me I am very picky and dont want my pinch weld touched annd the under scratched. For my free oil changes I tell to use the lift with the wheels on the rails platforms. The dealers are not the best place to protect your underneath when they lift your vehicle. What you dont see does not hurt them if they cause scratches etc under your vehicle.
 

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If your piece of wood is thick enough to clear the pinch by lets say one half inch your pinch weld will not be touched and no scratches. Trust me I am very picky and dont want my pinch weld touched annd the under scratched. For my free oil changes I tell to use the lift with the wheels on the rails platforms. The dealers are not the best place to protect your underneath when they lift your vehicle. What you dont see does not hurt them if they cause scratches etc under your vehicle.
Do you have a picture of what you use?
 

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I wish I would. What I use is some scrap pieces from my basement oak hardwood steps. There was a lots of left over when they built our new house. I cut the pieces aprx 3 inches wide or a bit less by aprx close to 10 inches long. My steps are quite thick at close to one and a half inch thick. It was the perfect free tool to raise my car without damaging the underneath. Of course with this method you have to make sure that you put some blocks at each wheels so the car dont move foward or backward while lifting. On my floor jack I bought the rubber insert pad to make the contact more safe. There are a lots of tools on the market like hockey puck with a grove in them and cheap insert that fits directly on the pin of your floor jack etc but found that none of them beats the good oak piece of wood. Like I mentioned earlier this is my way to do it for my gen1 but on most of the vehicles now the system to use the provided in car jack all uses the slot to fit in the pinch weld and for sure that you will end up with some scratches on the paint underneat using the O.E. jack. I hope some members will give their own opinions on their way to raise their new Traverse 2018. Good luck and be carefull.
 

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I don't want to scratch the pinchweld. My wife has the vehicle at work right now, but I believe it is safe to jack from the rear differential.

If you have one! For the gen2s AWD only.....no rear differential on FWDs.
 

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I've lifted countless vehicles many times using my jacks and various blocks of hardwood to absolutely no detriment. Though, I've always coveted those nifty pinch weld adapters, I've never ponied up.

What's you aversion to a block of hard wood?

Sent from my LG-H910 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Yes I have an AWD. I was just hoping for a crossmember in the front that I could jack from in the middle to get both sides up at the same time.
 

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Not a good idea to lift both sides at the same time. Go with the piece of hard wood on the location where they tell you in the manual. Put your piece of wood right behind the pinch weld making sure that the wood overlap (thicker) the pinch weld by aprx 1/4 inch so the jack foot plate dont touch your pinch wells and you are safe to raise it. Block your wheels with stoppers and the shifter in Park. P.s. loosen your wheels nuts a bit before you jack it.
 

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I've lifted countless vehicles many times using my jacks and various blocks of hardwood to absolutely no detriment. Though, I've always coveted those nifty pinch weld adapters, I've never ponied up.

What's you aversion to a block of hard wood?

Sent from my LG-H910 using Tapatalk



None if done right.


A piece of wood with a notch will work just fine, but make sure the notch is deeper than the weld and the wood is cut cross grain. Tried it once on a minivan and thought the kerf was cut deep enough (and maybe it was) but it was cut along the grain. When jacking the wood split in two under the kerf, along the grain and the two pieces flew out and the jack head smashed the pinch weld.....bent it back with a vice-grip and no permanent damage.
 

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SOL, There's no safe way to jack on the unit body other than the specific points in the manual, or the transaxle subfame without chance of damage. Other than flatbedding or tire strapping and vehicle can only be safely towed by attaching to the two specific reinforced slots in unitbody.



Only safe areas are reinfoirced unitbody rocker panels. Get a pinch weld adapter so there is no stress on the weld flap and all force is transmitted to the rocker........permits use of all hydraulic jacks so you don't have to play with the crapo jack in the trunk. Different types: slotted rubber hockey puck types and magnetic types that fit over the weld.


Just put on my winter tires/wheels and now know what's you guys were talking about. On My previous three vehicles the jack point was actually the pinch welds. So this Chevy was completely new to me.

Unfortunately My hockey puck wasn't thick enough to put any of the jack force on the rocker panel so had to use the crappyjack. I used my impact wrench to raise and lower it to save time and effort.

Anyhow, I am going in search of a pinch block that I can use for next time. Any suggestions?



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Just put the hard block behind the pinch weld on the inside of the weld and touching it only. No need to make a groove in the wood. The wood must be thicker than the tip of the weld to prevent damages. Put blocks in front and behind each other wheels and the handbrake on. The wood must be aprx 4-5 inches long and. The width aprx 3 inches wide. Use a good floor jack with a rubber foot pad. This is the way I do mine actually tomorrow. Will post pictures. Hardwood like solid oak is the best.
 

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Just put on my winter tires/wheels and now know what's you guys were talking about. On My previous three vehicles the jack point was actually the pinch welds. So this Chevy was completely new to me.

Unfortunately My hockey puck wasn't thick enough to put any of the jack force on the rocker panel so had to use the crappyjack. I used my impact wrench to raise and lower it to save time and effort.

Anyhow, I am going in search of a pinch block that I can use for next time. Any suggestions?



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Cut two more hockey pucks in half and stack them on top of the solid ones spaced a 1/2" or so apart to gain thickness and leave a slot in the middle for the pinch weld.


Solution to lifting both sides of the front at the same time?

Ans = two jacks.
 

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Cut two more hockey pucks in half and stack them on top of the solid ones spaced a 1/2" or so apart to gain thickness and leave a slot in the middle for the pinch weld.

Actually, the pinch weld on mine is only exposed at the lift points as the lower body panel wraps around underneath right to the weld. So only one side of the weld is exposed there so I don't need a gap for the pinch weld. I'll try cutting another puck in half and gluing/screwing it together and that should give me the height I need.

My only concern is creating a block that is stable and won't slide out.




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Then Capucine's method will work a piece of wood just long enough to span the pinch weld on both sides of the lift point.
 
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