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Author Topic: Preserving AC lines  (Read 3144 times)
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Quantum
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« on: June 27, 2010, 08:07:32 AM »

I was talking to my neighbour the other day, who has a 2007 Pontiac Montana SV6 with rear A/C unit.  He said that this year his AC was not working very well.  He took it to the dealership and was told that the AC lines running to the back unit were rotted out!

He as very surprised to hear that about a 3 year old van.  The service technician told him this was a very common problem, because they are aluminum lines and the salt in the winter just pits the aluminum.  Also, his evapourator has a small leak.  All together it was $1900 (Canadian) to fix it.

I looked under my Traverse, and see those aluminum lines just exposed under there.  I know someone on the Acadia forum with a 2007 is already complaining about her A/C not working.

I am wondering if before the winter I should put some sort coating (under coating) on those AC lines.  Or maybe rocker panel paint?

What are your thoughts? 
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« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2010, 01:04:02 PM »

Interesting; I wonder why the under carriage lines are made of aluminum?  Doesn't matter at this point.....the rocker panel paint would certainly be cheaper than trying to fix a rear AC problem
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bigtallvandy
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« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2010, 08:28:45 PM »

Quantum,

Check out POR 15.  Cures rock hard and is simply to be 'brushed' on.  Can be used on seasoned surfaces like that nasty rust on your muffler hanger.

http://www.por15.com/POR-15/productinfo/1GB/


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scotchy
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« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2010, 10:58:46 PM »

I personally used a POR 15 kit to recoat the inside of my 1965 motorcycle's gas tank which had considerable rust because the prior owner didn't season it prior to storage and it eventually leaked. After a serioes of rust remover, bare metal primer, and then a coat of POR 15 it completely sealed the tank and doesn' t leak.  That was over four years ago.


That being said I'm not sure how well it will work if you don't completely coat the lines off of the Traverse.  My guess is wherever there is a hangar it will eventually corrode.  I'm not sure why they don't use copper instead of aluminum it must be a money thing.
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« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2010, 10:59:02 AM »

  I'm not sure why they don't use copper instead of aluminum it must be a money thing.

Have you seen the price of copper lately; people steal copper just so they can sell it to scrap
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VB - LTZ
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« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2010, 06:03:11 AM »

 Smiley You could always just use and aluminum polish I had a friend that had a Harley Davidson Motorcycle and the there was a lot of aluminum on that he used to polish that think up and it looked like chrome. The polish looked like tooth past and he got it from the Harley shop never seen any corrosion on his bike.

 Cool Steve
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« Reply #6 on: June 30, 2010, 10:00:44 AM »

"never seen any corrosion on his bike." how could there be it's not like he's driving it in the winter w/ salt on the roads. Grin
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« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2010, 02:32:14 PM »

 Smiley I know you would think that but not every one has a garage and this thing would just set outside under a cover all winter and in the summer when he pulled the cover off the aluminum still looked like chrome so I am incline to think this stuff gave it some kind if protection. I had a set of old aluminum wheels setting out side behind my shed under a tarp for around two years and just chucked them they looked so bad. You could more than likely just sand and paint the A/C lines if you looking for something to stop corrosion check out an auto paint store. I used the stuff my friend used on his bike on my 1980 L82 corvette’s wheels and the wheels looked like chrome water just rolled off them it actually penetrates the metal and stop’s it from cording and yes I drove my corvette in the winter and the wheels always looked great.

 Cool Steve
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bigtallvandy
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« Reply #8 on: June 30, 2010, 08:29:24 PM »

I used S100 Polishing Soap on chrome rims, not sure if that's the same stuff you're talking about.  S100 works awesome on reviving chrome.  Lots of chrome on bikes too.  Not so sure about polishing the aluminum with it though.  May be some other product off the shelf over at HD.
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Quantum
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« Reply #9 on: June 30, 2010, 11:24:55 PM »

I am going to look into a spray type of application.  Something from the auto parts store.  I figure if I spray something on, its easier to get all the nooks and crannies.  I'm mostly concerned about the lines that run under the vehicle.  Any in the engine bay I'm not concerned about.  My 1998 Grand AM had an ice cold AC system when I sold it last year, and it was all aluminum in the engine bay.

I think that they just use a cheaper line set going to the back of the vehicle.  A thinner wall tubing. 

Thanks for all the input!
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Toddzilla67
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« Reply #10 on: July 10, 2010, 01:34:45 AM »

I have been watching this thread for a while.

I have another recommendation that might cost you a little time and a couple of bucks a week if you can't do it at home.  During the winter months find a drive-through carwash that has an under-carriage spray.  This may not get every little bit of road salt and/or magnesium chloride cleaned off of those aluminum A/C lines, but it may be preventive enough to keep real problems from happening. 

I have not gotten under our Traverse yet to inspect any plumbing yet, but I suspect the (probably aluminum) fuel lines are equally vulnerable to this corrosive exposure.

For rocker panel paint (really any painted surface, chrome, head lamps, tail lamps or glass) I would suggest a product called RejeX.  This is a sealant (not a wax) that I just applied to our Traverse last weekend.  I used a clay bar on the paint first to clean all the road grime and other contaminants from the paint, then applied RejeX.  It shines really nice, beads water like nothing I've ever used and makes getting bugs and other road grime off the car effortless.  An application will last at least 4-6 months (supposedly longer in milder climates), so I will re-apply in October to keep winter de-icing products off the clear-coat and the crappy plastic chrome. 

BTW, POR 15 is a great product if you want to apply it to the underside of the vehicle.
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« Reply #11 on: July 10, 2010, 07:18:46 AM »

Thats what I did with mine this winter. Once or twice a week I took it through the touchless with the high pressure undercarriage wash. Then in the April I took out the pressure washer, put it on jack stands and cleaned all the other stuff from under there. After the first winter my lines look the same so far. I traded a 94 Suburban with 175k for the Traverse. It had rear heat and AC all with aluminum lines and never had to replace them.
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